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THE PILGRIM 

Volume XIV Plymouth, Mass., June, 1935 No. 1 

Published this year as a Senior Year Book 

1934 THE PILGRIM STAFF 193 5 

Editor-in-Chief __---______._ Lucy Holmes 

Assistant Editor-in-Chief -_- _ Alba Martinelli 

Literary Editor _____ Charles Cooper 

Assistant Literary Editor ---------- Jean Whiting 

Business Manager ---------- Stephen Cappannari 

Assistant Business Manager - Deane Beytes 

Boys' Athletics Bradford Martin 

Girls' Athletics -------_____ Helen Brewer 

Art .-.------.-.--.-.-'-.'- Priscilla McCosh 

Exchange Editor --- ___ William Pearson 

Assistant Exchange Editor --------- Warren Bradford 

French Editor ---- _._ Marjorie Cantoni 

Latin Editor ------------ Dorothy Perkins 

Alumni Editor _______ Barbara Mellor 

Joke Editor ___ Warren Strong 

Assistant Joke Editor ---------- Audrey Dutton 

School News Editor ----______ Marion McGinnis 

Assistant School News Editor ___ Mary Bodell 

Feature Editor _____ Katharine Lahey 

Freshman Editor -- ___ Francis Sheid 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

COMMENCEMENT PAGE 

History of the Class of 1935 ------____ 

Random Shafts -----__ _ 

------ 5 

Last Will and Testament -------•___ -. r 

Proverbs That Fit ----'----__'_ 

Class Song -------•--_._ 

Pet Annoyances of the Faculty -•-,-----__.. -.,- 

Class Prophecy ---_._____ 

Class Poem -■---------'____ oft 

Principal's Column --------•___ -22 

Life's Creed ---------____ 2 2 

LITERATURE 

Where Patience is Paramount """--------24 

Sick Leave ----------___ pc- 

Perusing the Ads ----------- ___oe 

Exultation ---------- or; 

Windows ______ --------- 26 

Shoes -----------_____ og 

On Having the Grippe -------------26 

The Knitting Habit ----------__. 27 

Security -'- - - - - - - _ . _ _ _ _ _ 2 7 

The Wind's Challenge - - -' _ _ 2 j 

Sunrise --------------- 27 

A New Literary Genius? ---------___ 28 

The Derelict - - ■ - - - - - - . _ . . _ _ -28 

Sophomore Poetry Page ------------ 29 

Ave Maria --____ ---.___ ---30 

THE ALUMNI NOTES ------- _ 31 

UNDER THE WHITE CUPOLA ------- 32 

EXCERPTS FROM "THE ATTEMPT" ----------- 33 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES ------------__ 34 

EXCHANGES --------- _ 36 

ATHLETICS ---------------- 37 

AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL ---------._.. 39 

FRESHMAN POETRY ---------- i ___ 40 

WHEN I WAS SMALL ----- - - - - 41 

TEMPTATION ---------------.41 

THE CEILING ---------- 41 

THE LAMP OF KNOWLEDGE - 41 

ALONE ---------- - - 41 



THE PILGRIM 



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THE PILGRIM 



Class of 1935 
of 



Plymouth High School 



OFFICERS 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Albert Wilbur Padovani, Jr. 

Bradford Martin 

Marjorie Bradford 

Barbara Mellor 



CLASS COLORS 
Yale Blue and White 

CLASS MOTTO 
Respice, Adspice, Prospice 

CLASS FLOWER 
Larkspur and White Rose 

History of the Class of iqjj 



JT is the duty of any historian, whether 
he is writing an account of the 
Peloponnesian War or the history of his 
class, to record facts and events without 
embellishing them with the fruits of his 
imagination. His statements should be 
unbiased. Love for country, race, or class 
should not be allowed to color his words. 
In the past, class historians have been 
prone to extol the endeavors of their 
class, and to leave untold their failures. 
We, however, shall attempt to play the 
role of a real historian. Our history 
shall be free from hyperbolic statements 
and undeserved praise, nor shall we 
omit those events which cast no favor- 
able reflection upon us. 

With this in mind we proceed to 
record the events of our first year in 
Plymouth High School. As freshmen, 
we were an unp resuming, yet hopeful, 
class. We found very few opportunities 
to prove our worth, or to learn from ex- 
perience. As freshman classes before 
and since have done, we took charge of 
our own assemblies, and several rather 
good plays were produced. Some of us 
participated in the "Pilgrim" advertis- 
ing contest and assisted in financing 
that publication. It was in this year 
that a section of the "Pilgrim" was very 
generously given to us, and it was edited 
by a staff composed of freshmen. The one 
successful event of our first year was 
the freshman dance, the planning of 
which was entirely in the hands of the 



faculty. Thus our freshman year ended 
without our having either disgraced or 
distinguished ourselves. 

The second year was even less event- 
ful than the first. We plodded through 
the year without playing an important 
part in any school project. Therefore 
the historian can not be held responsi- 
ble for the brevity of this chapter of 
our history. 

As juniors, with a newly acquired 
feeling of importance, our hopes rose. 
There was some excitement this year 
concerning the choice of class rings. 
When this matter had been settled, we 
decided to choose our class colors in- 
stead of waiting until we were seniors. 
Our choice, green and silver, was used in 
decorating Memorial Hall for our Junior 
Prom. This occasion, we can truthfully 
say, was a success socially and finan- 
cially. Very little assistance except that 
of a supervisory nature was given us by 
the faculty, although we later learned 
that a faculty member reminded Mr. 
Shipman to remind our class president 
to remind us that the Junior Promenade 
was a Junior class responsibility, or it 
might never have taken place. Our class 
ring, also, was selected in the Junior 
year. And we recall that, when the 
Honor Society Initiation occurred, we 
were somewhat perturbed to see that 
only girls, seven of them, were elected 
from our class. Continued on page 15 



THE PILGRIM 



RANDOM 



ALBERT ALBERTINI 

Albert knows his baseball, 
He's good in studies, too — 
Challenge his decisions 
And see what he will do. 



WINSLOW ANDERSON 

If for every ship you've 

drawn 
You had earned two sous, 
You could buy a real one 
And take us on a cruise. 



ALICE ANDRADA 

There's sure to be some fun 
Wherever she may be, 
But be careful of her temper, 
It's just like T. N. T. 



OLGA ANDRIETTI 

Reticent is the word, 
She hasn't much to say — 
But we notice when reports 

are out 
Her marks are mostly A. 



ROBERT APPLETON 

He wants to be a lawyer — 
We hope his dreams come 

true, 
If we ever get in trouble, 

Bob, 
We'll bring our case to you. 



DORIS ARDIZZONI 

Doris, you think, is very shy 
Until you know her well, 
Then you'll find she's lots of 

fun 
As all her friends can tell. 




SHAFTS 



ALICE BARUFALDI 

She's helpful and competent, 
This little girl so wise — 
Smiling and joyous 
With a sparkle in her eyes. 



ANDREW BASLER 

For dancing, Basler has a 

flair, 
He surely has that "savoir 

faire"— 
In fact, the critics all declare 
He'll be the ruin of Fred 

Astaire. 



CHARLES 

BAUMGARTNER 

We hope this rhyme won't 

get you 
In bad with pa and ma, 
But tell us, Charlie, who's the 

girl 
You take riding in your car? 



ENIS BERGONZINI 

From the looks of her clothes 
And the way they fit, 
We take it that Enis 
Likes to knit! 



LUCY BERNAGOZZI 

She made a red sweater, 
A white one, a blue — 
To all it is obvious 
To her flag she is true. 



MADELINE BERNARDO 

With that flaming hair 
And winning way, 
While the sun shines 
She's making "Hey". 



THE PILGRIM 



JEAN BEYTES 

Good things come in small 

packages 
Is a popular saying, we 

find— 
The person who had that 

idea first 
Must have had Jean in mind. 



RAMO BONGIOVANNI 

Now that you're a big boy 
We give you this advice, 
Sticking out your tongue, 

Ray, 
Really isn't nice. 



JAMES BOYLE 

Jimmie goes whistling 
Throughout the livelong day, 
He doesn't always look it, 
But he really must feel gay. 



MARJORIE BRADFORD 

Everybody likes her; 

This statement needs no 

proof — 
And while we're at it, Margy, 
Why do they call him 

"Boof"? 



HELEN BREWER 

To ride horses, to play golf, 
Is fun for this girl so tall, 
And when it's baskets that 

we need, 
She's right there with the 

ball. 



JAMES CADOSE 

Jimmie scorns La Garbo, 
He sneers at Miss Mae West, 
Jan Garber's wailing music 
Is what he likes the best. 




MARJORIE CANTONI 

Margie is the chubby girl 

Who drives a Ford V-8, 

She tried to bribe us not to 

say 
She always gets there late. 



STEPHEN CAPPANNARI 

He may be right 
Or he may be wrong, 
But he can argue 
The whole day long. 



ANTHONY CARAMELLO 

Folks, meet Stevie's nurse- 
maid, 

A man both tried and true, 

And at the Old Colony 
Theatre, 

He will usher you. 



JOHN CHAPMAN 

Chapman is our silent lad, 
Apparently quite shy 
Until he starts to labor with 
His photographic eye. 



LENA CHIARI 

You've heard the simile, 
"As neat as a pin" — 
Any contest for neatness 
Our Lena would win. 



JAMES CLARK 

Don't try them on us, Jim, 
For we've often heard 
Your list of excuses — 
And some are absurd. 



THE PILGRIM 



CHARLES COOPER 

Cooper is our essayist 
And our speaker, too, 
Since he's a willing worker, 
We give him lots to do. 



JOSEPH COSTA 

He wants to spend his life 
In barber's long white 

smocks, 
We wish you lots of luck, Joe, 
When you snip unruly locks. 



GINO CRISTOFORI 

He makes life most difficult 
For the would-be poet, 
If he has a weakness, 
He's careful not to show it. 



ANGELINA DE TRANI 

Angie serves at recess time — 
Some day she will get caught, 
She tries to sell cold frank- 
furters 
By telling us they're hot. 



JAMES DEVITT 

A sign of temper 
Is red hair, 
But your outbursts 
Must be rare. 



DAVID DIAS 

"Dizzy" and "Daffy" you may 

not be 
In the days to come, 
But David Dias has the D's 
And that may help you some. 




SARAH DILL 

She has a very friendly way, 
We all know that is true — 
And "Amby", who's from 

Brockton, 
Apparently knows it, too. 



BEATRICE DUBE 

If there's any business 
Or shorthand to be done, 
If you want a typist, 
Bea Dube is the one. 



ERIC ECCLESTON 

Eric soon will write headlines 
And burn the midnight oil 
Instead of planting pines 
And producing from the soil. 



EVELYN ELLIS 

A vote of thanks 
We owe this lass, 
For writing the poem 
For our class. 



MALVINA EMOND 

Blue-eyed girl and blue-eyed 

dad 
Capering down the hall, 
They know the very latest 

steps 
To demonstrate to all. 



ATTEO FERAZZI 

He is athletic, 
A wizard with the ball — 
But, Teo, why so bashful? 
We don't hear you at all. 



THE PILGRIM 



HELEN FINNEY 

We don't see much of Helen, 
She lives in Chiltonville — 
We used to call her "Peanut" 
And "Peanut" fits her still. 



NITA FIOCCHI 

She liked Horatio's type, she 

said, 
In English class one day — 
You might look up your 

Hamlet, boys, 
It's an idea, anyway. 



ARMANDO FORTINI 

Fortini is a quiet boy — 
In school time, we might add, 
For when he is at dances 
He is a playful lad. 



FLORA FORTINI 

She doesn't like dance music ? 
The idea is absurd — 
Every orchestra is 0. K., 
But Loring's is preferred. 



DORIS FRASER 

Doris has a diamond ring 
Which she proudly flashes, 
And every day in George's 

car 
Around the town she dashes. 



NORMA GALLERANI 

Norma wants to be a nurse, 
We've been often told, 
If you're ever feeling ill, 
Give her your hand to hold. 




ELSIE GARUTI 

She avoids much trouble 
Because she holds her tongue, 
In quiet words and simple 
Her praises should be sung. 



ROBERT GLASS 

We've always held 
It isn't fair 
For boys to have 
Such curly hair. 



ANNA GOLDBERGH 

Anna comes from Palestine, 
And that's where she longs to 

be, 
She hopes some day she can 

return 
To her home across the sea. 



JEANETTE GOODWIN 

Riding is her hobby, 
What she wants, of course, 
Is a real live charger — 
Not a hobby-horse. 



TERESA GOVI 

"Tessie" can dance 
And "Sampy" can sing, 
Together they rival 
"Ginger" and "Bing". 



VINCENT GOVONI 

Govoni and his harmonica 
Make an inseparable pair — 
For wherever you find Govoni 
There's sure to be music 
there. 



THE PILGRIM 



LAWRENCE GUERRA 

If you want information 
About Plymouth Rock, 
Hunt up "Hickey" Guerra 
And listen to him talk. 



MANDO GUIDOBONI 

First it will laugh and 

chuckle, 
Then it will moan and 

groan — 
No, it's not an apparition — 
It's Mando's saxaphone. 



ALMA GUIDETTI 

Inclined to giggle, 
Inclined to talk, 
But in girls' sports 
She wins in a walk. 



JACK GUIMARES 

We must say you've changed 

a lot 
Since your freshman days, 
For then you turned a vivid 

red 
When you met a lady's gaze. 



ESTHER HALEY 

Esther plays the fiddle 
In the orchestra at school, 
Really she is full of fun, 
Though she's quiet, as a rule. 



EDWARD HALL 

He's such a very quiet lad 

He would create a panic 

If he should some day just 

stand up 
And yell with voice titanic. 




GERTRUDE HENNING 

Gert is our class tomboy, 
She dresses like a man, 
With her lovely golden hair 
We don't see how she can. 



LUCY HOLMES 

Lucy has a petition, 

It's little enough that she 

asks: 
More hours in the day or 

days in the week 
To complete her innumerable 

tasks. 



ALONZO JAMES 

It's easy to remember 
And so hard to forget 
That in the field of sports 
He's our safest bet. 



FRANCES JOHNSON 

Lively eyes and dimples deep 
Frances possesses, 
She may as well use them 
She shyly confesses. 



WARREN JOHNSON 

He told us this himself, 
Strange though it appears; 
If he doesn't want to hear us, 
He will "close his ears". 



NANCY KABELSKY 

As you go down the corridor, 
If you see some curly hair 
And hear a little giggle — 
You'll know that Nancy's 
there. 



10 



THE PILGRIM 



MARGUERITE KETCHEN 

Marguerite is the little girl 
Whose pig-tails you have 

seen, 
All she needs is a lolly-pop 
And some chocolate ice- 
cream. 



MARJORIE KIERSTEAD 

Maybe she can sew a seam, 

Maybe she can cook — 

But her greatest pride and 

joy 
Is her history notebook. 



KATHERINE LAHEY 

Katharine calls for helpers 

For she is overworked, 

But when she checks up on 

them, 
She finds that they have 

shirked. 



HILDA LA VOIE 

Hilda and Elsie 
Are together each day, 
Whether at work 
Or whether at play. 



JOSEPH LAWRENCE 

The Emerald Isle is famous, 
So is the "Isle of Capri", 
But Joe feels an isle on the 

Azores 
Is really the best place to be. 



OLGA LONGINOTTI 

Olga works in Buttner's, 
And she's a good clerk, too; 
When we need some shopping 

hints, 
We'll all come straight to 

you. 




JAMES LOUDEN 

The b-r-r-raes of bonney 

Scotland 
Have lost a bonny lad — 
Jim came to America, 
Which makes us vera gl-l-lad. 



ANN MABBETT 

Ann is always happy — 
She has a smile for all, 
And, if you hear a titter, 
Why, it's Ann in study hall. 



CHARLES MACCAFERRI 

The power behind the throne, 
A second Bismark he — 
To sartorial perfection 
He holds the golden key. 



ERMES MANZOTTI 

Whenever we've needed music 
For a school affair, 
We have summoned Ermes 
And "music filled the air". 



OSCAR MARSH 

Oscar, the pride of Ellisville, 

Is a lanky lad; 

Tries his hand at many 

things — 
But radio's his fad. 



BRADFORD MARTIN 

To this weighty problem 

For an answer we are look- 
ing; 

He does so much in every 
sport, 

When can he practice cook- 
ing? 



THE PILGRIM 



11 



CARROLL MARTIN 



Carroll is an usher 
At the Interstate, 
He will guide you 

seat 
If you come in late. 



to your 



ROLAND MARTIN 

The Dionne quintuplets 
Have risen to fame, 
Our Martin triumvirate 
Must do the same. 



ROBERT MARVELLI 

Girls, take warning! 
Watch your step — 
He may seem shy 
But he's full of pep. 



JEANNE MAYNARD 

We're sorry, Jeanne, 
That you went away, 
And sincerely hope 
You'll come back some day. 



GERALD MAYO 

Can this be Daddy Long Legs, 

Or it is Ichabod Crane? 

But, anyway, with those 

long legs 
He'll never miss a train. 



MARION McGINNIS 

You fear oral topics? 
Then how you must hate 
To recite in your classes 
And engage in debate. 




JOHN MEDEIROS 

Willing heart and willing 

hands 
We ascribe to you, 
For you have shown us both 
On occasions not a few. 



FRANK MELLO 

Frankie knows his onions, 
His peas and apples, too; 
He's always ready with that 

smile 
To sell his goods to you. 



BARBARA MELLOR 

To run a dancing party? 

To decorate the hall? 

To play watch-dog o'er our 

treasury ? 
Barbara Mellor's at our call. 



ELIZABETH MORDT 

Whenever we are planning 
To put on some affair, 
Play, assembly, operetta — 
Bettie's always there. 



VINCENT NERI 

That Vinnie is a quiet boy 
If far beyond believing, 
Though he often looks that 

way, 
Appearance is deceiving. 



LESTER NICKERSON 

"Deeds, not words" 
Is this boy's creed, 
Not a bad one 
For us to heed. 



12 



THE PILGRIM 



ELSIE OTTANI 

Dark and winsome 
She's always sweet, 
Smart and smiling 
And rather petite. 



ALBERT PADOVANI 

Parliamentary procedure 
He was forced to acquire, 
Now to the state senate 
He well may aspire. 



AMELIO PASOLINI 

Many strange nicknames 
We have heard, 
But calling you "Peanuts" 
Is really absurd. 



WILLIAM PEARSON 

He doesn't rave and tear his 

hair, 
He doesn't sit and pine — 
But his life is one mad 

scramble 
To get work in on time. 



MANDO PELLEGRINI 

Quiet here and boisterous 

there — 
He is a contradiction; 
As to which adjective fits 

best 
We have no real conviction. 



CHARLOTTE PIERCE 

No matter what trouble 
Charlotte is in, 
She soon overcomes it 
With her cheerful grin. 




NELLIE PIERCE 

She lives her life 
Without making much noise, 
But she enjoys Saquish 
And baseball with boys. 



EARLE PIMENTAL 

We think we've solved your 

problem 
The very best way to date: 
Just swap your smile for 

Mayo's legs — 
And then you won't be late. 



HELEN PIRANI 

Smartly dressed 
Our Helen is gay, 
Correctly attired 
At work or at play. 



JAMES PRATT 

Pratt is fond of cooking, 

He makes both cake and pie, 

For he can eat whate'er he 

cooks — 
Maybe that's the reason why. 



ANTONIO PROVINZANO 

Does he get excited 
When he's keeping score? 
When we make a basket, 
He promptly yells for more. 



ARTHUR RAGAZZINI 

The girl of his choice, 
He confessed in class, 
Must be a pretty 
But not clever lass. 



THE PILGRIM 



13 



ANITA REGGIANI 

Anita is a little girl 
Who's always in a rush, 
Ask her where she buys her 

gas 
If you want to see her blush. 



AURORA REGINI 

She did her part in hockey 
In basketball and track, 
We can see for every sport 
She surely has a knack. 



DARIO ROMANO 

He seems gay and indepen- 
dent 
To the struggling masses, 
But we'd also look like that 
If we had but two classes. 



MARY ROSSETTI 

What can we say of Mary? 
She's small and rather shy, 
And greets you with a cheer- 
ful smile 
Whenever she walks by. 



NATALIE RUBINSTEIN 

Her interest in clothes 
She comes rightly by, 
She made our Christmas 

players 
Most pleasing to the eye. 



VIRGINIA RYDER 

Gentlemen prefer the blondes 
We have often heard; 
This assertion must be true, 
For "Ginnie" is preferred. 




JESSIE SANDERSON 

It takes a lot to ruffle 

Jessie — 
For with eye and mind both 

keen 
She goes about her business 
Always placid and serene. 



WILFRED SANTERRE 

If the day is sunny, 
Or if there's rain or snow, 
He will take his pop-gun 
And a-hunting go. 



ERMA SEARS 

Erma's never happy 
Unless she can ride, 
A horse and a habit — 
These are her pride. 



MARGARET SIMMONS 

Meg is quiet and reserved, 
And always when she's sit- 
ting, 
If she isn't doing homework, 
We'll bet you'll find her knit- 
ting. 



HELEN SMITH 

A hasty inspection 
Of the covers of our books 
Shows that without question 
Hers are worst for looks. 



ERNESTINE SQUIBB 

Ernestine has been with us 
For just a little while, 
Although she is a quiet girl, 
She wears a friendly smile. 



14 



THE PILGRIM 



ARTHUR STRASSEL 

We have it from a Junior 
That he's her perfect man, 
But Artie only smiles and 

says, 
"Let her catch me — if she 

can!" 



WARREN STRONG 

How Warren Strong must 

have envied 
Browning's Herve Riel! 
For Herve didn't have to go 

to school 
To become an admiral. 



LOUISE SWIFT 

She likes to ride, 
Plays tennis, too, 
There isn't much 
She doesn't do. 



RUTH TINGLEY 

"Tinker" often dances, 
Tennis she enjoys, 
She's very fond of riding- 
And also fond of boys. 



NELLO TORRI 

In studies Nello has attained 
An envied reputation, 
An how Miss Carey did enjoy 
His French pronunciation! 



DONALD TRACY 

When he tells of his exploits 
We hold our breath with 

pride, 
Baron Munchausen's second 

rate 
When Tracy hits his stride. 



ARTHUR 
STRASSEL 



MARGARET 
VALLER 




MARGARET VALLER 

Margaret comes from Mano- 
met, 

The distance isn't great — 

And though she's often ab- 
sent, 

She is never late. 



RICHARD VOGHT 

When he had his picture 

taken, 
The photographer opined 
That he would "take" the 

best of all — 
His face was the right kind. 



CHARLES WALL 

On a stormy day near the 

sea, 
With a gun or two to shoot, 
That's where Charley wants 

to be 
To kill a duck or coot. 



ALBERT WALTON 

From Atlantic to Pacific 
He's been within a year. 
For the title of class traveler 
This boy's without a peer. 



ESTHER WHITE 

A little girl 
With curly hair, 
A dance in town? — 
Then Esther's there. 



RUTH WHITING 

If to class you'd carry 

A shiny megaphone, 

Your right answers could be 

heard 
And your wisdom known. 



THE PILGRIM 



15 



ROBERT WILLIAMSON 

His golden eaglet 
He proudly displays, 
In scout activities 
He spends his days. 



MARGARET 

WIRZBURGER 



Always giggling, 
Always gay, 
Whatever is it 
Keeps you that way' 




ALLEN WOOD 

Lessons hold no terrors 
For our Allen Wood, 
It doesn't really seem 
That a girl from Whitman 
should. 



ROGER WOOD 

Roger is not always sure 
About the parts of speech, 
But life has its compensa- 
tions — 
Some subjects he could teach. 



EDNA WRIGHT 



In work or play 
We like her style, 
She is earnest 
All the while. 




Continued from page 4 



Finally our last year arrived. At first 
we were pleased with our exalted posi- 
tion, but we soon discovered that there 
was plenty of work attendant upon our 
new advantages. Unaccustomed as we 
were to assuming responsibilities, we 
were overwhelmed at times by the prob- 
lems confronting us. Our first endeavor 
was the Senior Dance held a few days 
before Christmas. Although the com- 
mittee worked long and earnestly, the 
dance was not well attended and conse- 
quently the profit was not great. The 
Christmas assembly program consisting 
of several living tableaux of Christmas 
carols prepared in two weeks, was our 
most successful stage production — since 
it was our only one. 

Although, as a class, we did not dis- 
tinguish ourselves in athletics, several 
members have won praise. Among our 
football heroes were Arthur Ragazzini, 



Bradford Martin, and Andrew Easier. 
Atteo Ferazzi and Gerald Mayo were 
proficient in basketball, while Bradford 
Martin, our most outstanding player, 
won a trophy for his excellence in shoot- 
ing fouls. 

The only outstanding mark of effi- 
ciency demonstrated in our Junior year, 
the choosing of our class colors, was un- 
done, when, as exalted Seniors, we ex- 
ercised the privilege of changing our 
minds, rescinded the vote, and decided 
upon blue and white. These colors we 
shall use at our class banquet, on com- 
mencement and class night. With many 
regrets that our history is not a brilliant 
account of many worthwhile deeds and 
startling successes, we bequeath our de- 
termination to tell the unvarnished 
truth to the historians of the class of 
1936. 

Lucy Holmes 



16 



THE PILGRIM 



Last Will and Testament 



J-JAVING successfully battled our way 
through four years of Depression 
and unsuccessfully looked around cor- 
ners for Prosperity, we, the courageous 
and overworked class of 1935, do hereby 
bestow the following humble items upon 
a most deserving faculty which has 
guided our staggering steps toward 
graduation during these last four years : 

To Mr. Shipman: A dark room for the 
purpose of demonstrating to the Camera 
Club the methods of developing and 
printing pictures (when there is a new 
P. H. S.). 

To Mrs. Raymond: Another Stephen 
Cappannari to furnish subjects for ar- 
gumentation. 

To Miss Brown : A carload of cough- 
drops to be used the morning after a 
game. 

To Mr. Bagnall: A sound proof 
room (when there is a new P. H. S.) so 
that "La Marseilles" will not disturb his 
history classes. 

To Miss Carey: The biography and 
works of Gertrude Stein for the delec- 
tation of her French classes. 

To Miss Wilber: Courage with 
which to flaunt public opinion so that 
she may ride her bicycle in Plymouth. 

To Miss Judd: A "keep-out" sign for 
her classroom door. It might eliminate 
those trying interruptions during short- 
hand dictation. 

To Mr. Smiley: A new book on the 
advanced methods of grunting. 

To Mr. Young: Twelve lessons in 
drawing for the purpose of enabling the 
agricultural classes to distinguish pigs 
from hens. 

To Mr. Albertin : Three Cheers ! He 
has proved that it is possible to "change 
horses in mid-stream" successfully. 

To Miss Kelly : Rubber heels for her 
shoes, if she really wishes to discover 
who's been talking. 

To Mrs. Swift: A special alarm clock 
to wake sleepy Sophomores on Mon- 
day morning. (At any time when 
she has no use for it, Miss Wilber might 
like to borrow it.) 

To Mr. Pioppi: An orchestra minus 
just a few violins. 

To Miss Rafter: Ancient Histories 
minus the story of the Persian Invas- 
ions. We're sure this will meet with the 



approval of the Sophomore history 
students. 

To Miss Locklin: A room large 
enough to hold her math classes (when 
there is a new P. H. S.) . 

To Mr. Smith: A shiny new bus to 
furnish transportation for the "girl- 
friends" of the basketball teams. We 
believe this will relieve the minds of the 
boys and enable them to play a better 
game. 

To Miss Jacques: A new French 
word to substitute for "maintenant." 

To Mr. Mongan: Apologies for the 
fact that our College Board English 
class may have disturbed the industri- 
ous Freshmen. 

To Miss Dowling: An invitation — 
not to a dance — to come across the 
street. We never see her in the main 
building. 

To Miss McNerny: A yardstick. It 
will save her steps. 

To Miss Humphrey : A policeman to 
direct traffic around her desk at 12:30. 

To Miss Lang : Bubblers in her class 
rooms as an aid to her throat. 

To Miss Johnson: Typewriting 
books beautifully illustrated with pic- 
tures of Clark Gable and Mae West. 
This will undoubtedly eliminate "Eyes 
on your books." 

To Miss Coombs: A padlock for the 
office door to keep out would-be 
"helpers." 

To Mrs. Garvin: Appreciative spec- 
tators for girls' sports. 

To The Freshman Faculty: Our 
promise that we'll vote for a new school 
when we're twenty-one. 

To The Class of 1936 : A deep, dark 
secret. (Sh-sh) Mrs. Raymond will use 
you for guinea pigs in her psychological 
experiments. Don't say we didn't warn 
you! 

To The Class of 1937: A memory 
book. Did you forget a Sophomore Hop ? 

To The Class of 1938: Roberts' 
Rules of Order for class meetings. We 
hope you won't need it — but we believe 
in preparedness. 

Signed, sealed, published, and de- 
clared by the above-named Class of 
1935, as and for their last will and test- 
ament, in our presence, and we, in their 
presence at their request, and in the 
presence of each other have hereto sub- 
scribed our names as witnesses to the 
same: 

Pop I. Thsalermaan 
Mick E. Mousenminny 

Jean Beytes 
Madeline Bernardo 



THE PILGRIM 



17 



PROVERBS THAT FIT 



A bad cook licks his own fingers — 

Boys' cooking class 
A bad shift is better than none — 

Football team 
A large drum makes much noise — 

Andrew Basler 
Quality not quantity — 

Marjorie Cantoni 
Give place to your betters — Juniors 
Knowledge is power — Seniors 
Clothes help to make the man — 

Charles Maccaferri 
Sacrifice thy heart not on every altar — 

Ermes Manzotti 

Laugh and grow fat — "Rags" Ragazzini 

After supper walk a mile — Brad Martin 

He who counts the pennies shall know 

bright smiles — 

Vincent "Jelly" Baietti 
Better late than never — Jack Guimares 
Absence makes the heart grow fonder — 
Madeline Bernardo 
Birds of a feather flock together — 

Cat Club 

All work and no play makes Jack a dull 

boy — Warren Johnson 

Smile and the world smiles with you — 

Earle Pimental 
Live and let live — 

Mr. Smiley and his cats 
He who hesitates is lost — Class Banquet 
A guilty conscience needs no accuser — 
Girls who skip school to go shop- 
ping 
A little is better than none — 

Neglected homework 
Forbidden fruit is sweetest — 

Class Picnic 
Grin and bear it — Homework 
Half a loaf is better than none — 

Senior Get-together 
Let sleeping dogs lie — 

Senior Class Project 
He who is warm thinks all so — Faculty 
Love me, love my horse — Nettie 
Many hands make light work — 

The "Pilgrim" 
Strike while the iron is hot — 

Graduation Plans 

Poor reasons are worse than none — 

Jimmie Clark 

Look before you leap — Class colors 
Walls have ears — Athletic Room 
The less play the better — In Study Hall 
-Short and sweet — High School Days 
The best of friends must part — 

Class of '35 



CLASS SONG 

THE HARP OF LIFE 

With one vibrant chord we touch the 

harp of Life 
For the first time ; 
And in the answering tremor of its 

strings 
We know an exultation that we, 
The Class of 1935, 
Can play this instrument at will, 
Can touch its still, untroubled strings, 
And stir its very depths 
With our joys and sorrows, 
With our dreams and deeds. 
Tentatively 

We pluck the strings again; 
And God, the Great Musician, 
Smiles as the chord ascends 
High in the heavens, 
A symbol of our aspirations, 
An echo of our hopes and dreanns. 
World, we charge you, listen— 
For our hands, God willing, 
Will play such music as this harp 
Has never heard before. 

Marion E. McGinnis 

PET ANNOYANCES 
OF THE FACULTY 



Mr. Shipman: Crooked pictures on the 

wall 
Mr. Mongan: Radio crooners 
Mrs. Raymond: Broken-down fences 
Miss Brown: Clashing colors 
Miss Kelly: Pupils who cannot follow 

directions 
Miss Rafter : Affectionate dogs 
Miss McNerney: Songs from "Pina- 
fore" hummed in cooking class 
Miss Wilber: Mosquitoes 
Miss H. C. Johnson: Senior boys who 

act like infants 
Miss Kenefick : Persistent chatterboxes 
Mrs, Swift: Failure to write book re- 
ports on time 
Miss Lang : Interruptions 
Miss Carey : Day-dreaming in class 
Mr. Bagnall : Talk about nothing 
Miss Locklin : Lazy pupils 
Mr. Smiley : Human talking machines 
Miss Judd: Sixth period class of Busi- 
ness Organization 
Miss Humphrey : Misspelled words 
Miss Jacques : Exchanging glances 
Miss H. M. Johnson: People who talk 

when someone else is talking 
Miss Hayes : Pupils who recite in whis- 
pers 
Mr. Pyle : Waiting for people 
Mr. Young: Presumptuous and persis- 
tent prevaricators 



18 



THE PILGRIM 



Class Prophecy 

pERUSING the County Farm Courier, 
(of which Eric Eccleston is editor) 
edition of June 7, 1950, we are attracted 
to several sections of this influential 
organ. 

Glowing Praise exudes from the 
headlines. Fire Chief Charles Baum- 
gartner successfully battles blaze for 
four hours. — No, — we've mixed the 
headlines. He started out to quench the 
conflagration, but was diverted when he 
slipped on the skin of a banana which 
had come from James Devitt's fruit 
wagon. Minor calamities perpetrated 
by our errant chief were: upsetting 
Amelio Pasolini's fleet of peanut 
wagons, running over Carroll Martin's 
whiskers (he finally grew some), and 
slightly damaging a truck load of eggs 
en route to Wilfred Santerre's Grocery 
Store. 

Among the last-minute bulletins is a 
communication from Washington, D. C. 
(Department of Chiselers) which states 
that Stephen Cappannari, well known 
for his palliation by specious reasoning, 
has succeeded in jamming through the 
Senate a bill which prohibits using non- 
union labor in the pickle-packing indus- 
try. 

Another bulletin relative to the same 
subject says that James Clarke, eminent 
broker and believer in the open shop, 
asserts, "Wall Street is due for another 
panic. This upstart will ruin our pros- 
perity. Our forefathers got along with- 
out unionizing pickle plants, so why 
can't we?" 

Edward Hall, John Medeiros, and 
Albert Walton, well known soap-box 
orators, were this morning incarcerated 
in the local hoosegow because of a de- 
nunciatory speech directed against the 
bill. They will be defended by Robert 
Appleton, well-known lawyer. 

An interesting item from Timbuctoo 
tells us that Robert Marvelli, the famed 
linguist, who left here last year on a 
sight-seeing trip to foreign lands, has 
finally found someone to pay his passage 
to America. He was stranded there due 
to a distressing inability to remember 
the French, Italian, Spanish, Portu- 
guese, German, and Pig Latin for, 
"Brother, can you spare a dime?" 

We note that the launching of the 
newest Ocean Kiddie Kar (designed by 
Winslow Anderson) took place today. 
The monstrosity was christened by 
Marjorie Cantoni, who arrived late for 
the ceremony. Since some hardened 
filcher had stolen the champagne, 
Laurence Guerra heroically gave up his 



lunch, a thermos of Ovaltine, for the 
purpose. Anthony Caramello will pilot 
the ship around the Gurnet and back. 
Brave fellow ! 

The annual report from Angelina 
DeTrani's Orphan Asylum is printed in 
this issue. The Head Beadle, Ernestine 
Squibb, reports that, due to an epidemic 
of indigestion, Malvina Emond, the 
Keeper of the Grub, has been able to 
save a considerable amount of corn 
meal mush. Three cheers for the H. B. 
and the K. of the G. 

On page 2, several advertisements 
catch our eye. 

Jeanette Goodwin and Helen Brewer 
offer to demonstrate a horse-drawn 
automobile. "Absolutely the latest in 
society circles," they say. 

Gertrude Henning's store offers Man- 
nish Clothes for Women, and Womanish 
Clothes for Men. 

Marjorie Kierstead and Margaret 
Valler, proprietresses of the "Knittery" 
(everything for the knitter) will give a 
premium to anyone who can solve the 
jigsaw puzzle found on the back of 
"Daisy Chain" yarn, which is manufac- 
tured by Bradford Martin. 

Oscar Marsh's Funeral Emporium ex- 
tends season's greetings to all and 
thanks everyone for the excellent busi- 
ness he has been enjoying. 

Local business moguls announce a 
merger through which they hope to 
corner the market in Plymouth and its 
environs. Those engaged in this con- 
solidation are: Vincent Govoni, salami 
manufacturer de luxe, Robert William- 
son, breeder of contented cows, John 
Chapman, mugger (photographer to 
you) for the Police Department, and 
Nita Fiocchi, whose hair-bows have 
been copied by smart women every- 
where. 

Lucy Bernagozzi and Helen Finney 
announce several bargains this week. 
Drastic reductions in dust picker-uppers 
and cobweb-preventers are announced. 
They also offer, at reduced prices, 
Roland Martin's latest invention. It is 
called the "Mother's Helper," and per- 
forms several tasks simultaneously. For 
example, the machine can mix cocktails, 
cement, and creosote to form a delicious 
plum pudding. If you do not care for 
the pudding, merely switch to another 
wavelength and get "Reducing Exer- 
cises" by Gerald Mayo. No guarantee is 
given with any machine. 

Nello Torri, Chief Oyster of the 
Hoister, Hoister, and Dropper Co., will 
officiate at the renovation of the Plym- 
outhe Rocke. A new crack will be added. 

William Pearson has propagated a 
new kind of Peerless Pigeon. It is sold 



THE PILGRIM 



19 



under the slogan, "Guaranteed to 
please." 

The society page next claims our at- 
tention. 

At a recent gathering of (dumb) 
belles and (gaza) beaux at Near 
Admiral Warren Strong's country 
shanty, the following members of the 
elite were present: Madeline Bernado, 
celebrated siren of stage, screen, and tel- 
evision ; Lucy Holmes, winner of the 
title, "The Busiest Woman," and Jean 
Beytes, whose service to humanity in 
stamping out elephantiasis of the ego, a 
disease which threatened to wipe out 
the species of common goldfish, won 
her the admiration of many. 

Alice Andrada, whose latest produc- 
tion, "40 Thieves in the Washtub", has 
taken the nation by storm, will soon 
arrive here for a rest cure. 

Ermes Manzotti is the guest of honor 
at the home of the Guidaboni's. It will 
be remembered that Mr. Manzotti, 
whose theme song "Fantasie in Helio- 
trope," thrilled us at the basket-ball 
games, has recently composed another 
triumph. He calls it "Prelude to Tears," 
and writes it under the nom de plume 
of Iman Onion. 

On page 5, a column edited by Aurora 
Regini and Anita Reggiani, the Book- 
worm's Haven, has something of inter- 
est for all of us. Criticisms of the latest 
books include : 

A laudation of the latest effort of 
Andrew Easier and Gino Cristofori, the 
"Bally Who's Who." 

Praise for "Thwarted : Again," or, 
"The Villain Holds the Bag," which was 
written by the promising young author, 
Sarah Dill. 

An expert opinion on "Doughnut 
Dunking, Its Origin, Practice, and 
Value," by Robert Glass, champion 
dunker. 

An appreciative article on James 
Louden's "How to Get the Other Fellow 
to Buy the Drinks," which is a very de- 
pendable work since Mr. Louden is a 
recognized authority on the subject. 

Paeans of praise for "Sports" by 
Albert Albertini, Atteo Ferazzi, and 
James Boyle. 

The Woman's Page, conducted by 
Louise Swift and Helen Smith, claims 
its share of our attention. 

At the top of the page we are greeted 
by the homely philosophy of Sandy 
MacSquiff (alias Doris Ardizonni,) who 
says, "If at first you don't succeed, suck 
a lemon." There appears to be some 
collusion here, for immediately below 
this we find a suggestion from the editor 
that we patronize Frank Mello's Fruit 
Store. 



From the exchange columns we learn 
that: 

Ettiebay Ordtmay sends in a Norwe- 
gian recipe for an eggless, milkless, 
butterless, flourless cake. She asks, in 
return, a parasol and a steam heater. 

Pellie Nierce offers to exchange a 
kitchen stove and a clothesline for a 
bulkhead door and some laundry soap. 

Marion McGinnis, running true to 
form, asks, "Will some kind reader 
please send a left-handed monkey 
wrench in exchange for my canary?" 

The Question Box, under the able 
direction of Warren (Know-It- All) 
Johnson, has some interesting features. 
We cite an example of the work done by 
him and his aides : 

Q. Enclosed find my picture. The 
boy friend kissed me last night, under 
the mistletoe. Was that good luck? 

Signed : Brilliant, but a Sight 

A. Lady, with a face like yours, it 
was a miracle. 

Signed: Talln Hansum 

The Social Graces Department, con- 
ducted by Katherine Lahey, is the next 
object of our attention. In her article 
she describes the most refined way of 
soup dibbling. Her method is to use a 
straw. Very effete. 

The Editorial Page reflects the high 
sense of responsibility and criticism in 
the town. 

In a scathing article directed against 
the street cleaners because they wear 
out too many brooms, Margaret Wirz- 
burger advises that the street-cleaning 
contract be given to the rival cleaning 
concern, the Nodirt Corporation, which 
is managed by Antonio Provinzano. 

Jessie Sanderson's editorial expresses 
the general feeling which exists among 
the townspeople. She praises the actions 
of the Chief-of-Police, Ramo Bongio- 
vanni, and his able henchmen, Lieut. 
James Cadose and Serg't David Dias, 
who so gallantly promoted the ends of 
justice by apprehending Slippery Sam 
and Weary Willie, who were caught 
in the act of breaking the points 
of the Selectmen's pencils previous to 
the annual meeting. 

The Lost and Found Department, 
conducted by Olga Andrietti, lists the 
following as lost and not yet found: 
Lost: a wig from Joseph Costa's Ton- 

sorial Parlour. 
Lost: a violin, by Esther Haley. No re- 
ward. 
Lost: a few pounds, by Enis Bergonzini. 

And now for the Drayma and Cinema 
review ! 

Continued on page 21 



20 



THE PILGRIM 




THE PILGRIM 



21 



Continued from page 19 

A large photo of Helen Pirani em- 
bellishes the page. She is depicted as an 
Elf in the Sylvan Glade. Ruth Whiting, 
at the piano, accompanies her perform- 
ance with suitable music. 

Elsie Ottani and Esther White are 
being tripped by the light fantastic on 
July 4, at the Memorial Hall. What a 
show! 

An attractive advertisement divides 
this page into two parts. Chiari's Gown 
Shop, we learn, will introduce to Plym- 
outh, the latest creations of Rubinstein. 
Alice Barufaldi and Olga Longinotti 
will muddle the creations. (Little mann- 
ikin, what now?) 

To proceed : An educational lecture is 
scheduled to take place at Memorial Hall 
for July 6, the speaker to be Evelyn 
Ellis. Her subject will be "The Art of 
Propelling a Perambulator." She will 
illustrate her talk with the latest in 
turret-top baby carriages. (The turret 
tops were invented by Jack Guimares 
for the purpose of allowing Junior to at- 
tack passers-by with his bean blower in 
comparative safety.) 

A lecture, illustrated by stereopticon 
slides, on the subject, "Stew-beef or not 
Stew-beef" will be delivered by Teresa 
Govi, that talented speaker. The ma- 
chine will be operated by Charles Cole- 
man Wall. 

The Neri Plan ($25 a week, no taxes, 
and free bus-tickets) will be explained 
by Joseph Laurence next week. Come 
one, come all. There will be no collection. 

The movie program for the week in- 
cludes, "This Is a Pretty Kettle of Fish," 
which stars Virginia Ryder and Arthur 
Raggazini, and "Poor but Honest," or, 
"Shylock Gets His," which features 
Alma Guidetti, Edna Wright, and Elsie 
Garuti. 

The Men-About-Town (Dario Ro- 
mano and Earle Pimental) have a pro- 
fusion of patter this morning. We re- 
print their column, which reads: 

"Glimpsed Ann Mabbett accompanied 
by Marjorie Bradford and Donald 
Tracy trying out new fleet of Ford V8's 
— Noted Hilda LaVoie, Marguerite 
Ketchen, Doris Fraser, and Nancy 
Kabelsky, Professional High Power 
Saleswomen, out to increase the busi- 
ness of Richard Voght's Shoe Shine 
Shoppe. Dropped around to see above- 
mentioned establishment, and recog- 
nized among the attendants Mando Pell- 
egrini, Arthur Strassel, Lester Nicker- 
son, and Armando Fortini. The sign 
above the door of the establishment 



reads : "Pedal tegements well and artis- 
tically illuminated and rejuvenated for 
the infinitesimal remuneration of ten 
cents per operation." — Barbara Mellor, 
who last week zoomed thru the ether on 
a record-breaking, epoch-making, 
breath-taking nonstop flight to Mano- 
met and back, is still being feted and 
toasted throughout the town together 
with Flora Fortini, the new Minister to 
France. — Much thrilled to witness 
President Albert Padovani and Vice- 
President James Pratt at impressive 
corner-stone ceremonies of the new 
Plymouth High School (can you bear 
it ? ) — Super-modernistic prefabricated 
building designed by Charles Cooper — 
Stupendous Murals by Anna Goldbergh 
depicting the progress of the Class of 
1935 soon to be unveiled .... Members 
of new faculty appointed by Superin- 
tendent Allen Wood include Beatrice 
Dube, Instructress of Business Organi- 
zation; Charlotte Pierce, head of the 
English Department; Alonzo James, 
Physical Director .... A special drive to 
reduce the number of underweight 
students in the town is being conducted 
by the school nurses, Margaret Sim- 
mons and Erma Sears with the co-oper- 
ation of Roger Wood's Dairy . . . New 
Hart - Schaffner - Maccaferri Clothing 
store on Main street. 

The Instructor's Corner this week has 
an informative article on the "Care and 
Treatment of Fountain Pens" by Mary 
Rossetti and Ruth Tingley. 

A review of the latest flops, by 
Frances Johnson and Norma Gallerani, 
includes : 

Their impression of "Lost in a Fog," 
the latest Metro-Fox-Corp. production. 
Rating F 

Their opinion of "Once a Lunk-Head, 
Always a Lunk-Head." 
Rating, Z 

And now, having doggedly struggled 
through to the bitter end, we sigh with 
relief, and throw the paper where it 
belongs. 

James A. Louden 
Charles I. Cooper 



The editors wish to express 
their indebtedness to the Com- 
mercial Department for typing 
the copy for this issue of "The 
Pilgrim." 



22 



THE PILGRTM 



PROSPICE 

A new kind of book was presented to 
me recently by the publishers. It is 
called "Understanding America". This 
book, which is a collection of essays 
dealing with various phases of Amer- 
ican life, is intended to give the reader 
information whereby he may become ac- 
quainted with the many aspects of 
American civilization. I am impressed 
with its significance, designed, as it is, to 
help young people visualize many of the 
problems which must be solved if they 
are to make satisfactory progress to- 
ward the development of that type of 
society which is not only desirable but 
also possible in a democracy. To under- 
stand America and its ideals seems to 
me the crying need of the times. Every 
thoughtful person, young or old, must 
be aware that our civilization is con- 
temporary, ever-changing, and is lead- 
ing us on with a force and sweep, the ul- 
timate goal of which is not yet in sight. 
Therefore, it becomes our duty as well 
as opportunity to prepare ourselves for 
useful citizenship to the best of our 
ability and go forward with our minds 
open to truth, new or old, whenever or 
wherever it may be presented to us. 
Why is this necessary? Because democ- 
racy is a matter of growth and has not 
yet reached maturity. 

Dr. Arthur E. Morgan, president of 
Antioch College, states that "Democracy 
is not just a form of government, but a 
complex social achievement". By that 
he means that all should "share in the 
wealth and opportunity which society 
creates, each to the extent which will 
promote the greatest total welfare." 
That is a splendid ideal, isn't it? Yet too 
many Americans have failed to appre- 
ciate it and have sought to escape from 
the common lot to a privileged status. 
This is contrary to the purpose of de- 
mocracy and has given rise to a spirit 
of acquisitiveness, false standards of 
estimating individual worth, and over- 
emphasis on material wealth. True de- 
mocracy is possible only "with the de- 
velopment of high individual character 
and finds its expression only as individ- 
uals identify their own welfare with 
that of men in general". If we believe 
that this is true, then it seems to me 
that our first duty to democracy is to 
understand it. We should develop out- 
looks and appreciations such that, if 
likewise developed by others, thoroughly 



democratic forms of government, busi- 
ness, and social relationships would be 
encouraged and eventually established. 
It is entirely likely that during the years 
immediately before us as much thought 
and effort will be given to improving the 
conception and functions of a democratic 
society as have been devoted to the 
mastery of the physical world during the 
last two centuries. In all this you are 
to have an important share. I, there- 
fore, urge you to assume your responsi- 
bilities as citizens of a great country 
with intelligence and diligence. May you 
get a conception of America not only as 
it is, but as it ought to be — a nation in 
which every worthy individual can be 
guaranteed an honest and comfortable 
living, a nation in which much more 
national wealth shall be used to support 
education, build health and recreation 
centers instead of $35,000,000 battle- 
ships, a nation in which crime with its 
enormous cost is suppressed almost to 
the vanishing point, in which graft and 
dishonest practices in business and 
government shall be eliminated, a nation 
in which the ideals expressed in the 
Declaration of Independence and the 
Preamble to the Constitution become the 
guiding motive of conduct in all polit- 
ical, economic, and social life. Such a 
Utopia will probably not be fully real- 
ized in our day and generation, but we 
can help create it by seeing it even afar 
off and doing our part in contributing to 
its fulfillment. 



Wayne M. 



Shipman 

Principal 



LIFE'S CREED 

We go out of the early morning 
Into the noon of life ; 
Success is fair compensation 
For those who endure the strife. 

Life itself is a battle 
That is fought to the bitter end ; 
And they who obey the laws of God 
Their happy way will wend. 

Let us remember the rights of others, 
Let us take all that life will give ; 
May we give back the best that is in us, 
And a happy life we shall live. 

James Boyle '35 



THE PILGRIM 



23 




PLYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL FACULTY 

First Row, Lydia E. Judd, Elizabeth C. Kelly, Barbara M. Coombs, Secretary to the Principal, 
Margaret Kenneflck, Helen M. Johnson, Miriam A. Raymond, Katherine J. Lang, E. Doris Carey; 

Second Row, Helen C. Johnson, Jeannette C. Jacques, Louise B. Humphrey, Mary E. Hayes, Charlotte 
C. Brown, Kathleen McNerney, Nellie J. Locklin, Helen Swift, Amy M. Rafter, Margie E. Wilber 

Third Row, Edwin B. Young, Arthur G. Pyle, John H. Smith, Charles I. Bagnall, Richard Smiley, 
Edgar J. Mongan, Frank E. Fash, Wayne M. Shipman 




STAFF OF "THE PILGRIM" 

First Row, Alba Martinelli, Lucy Holmes, Stephen Cappannari, Audrey Dutton. 

Second Roid, Marjorie Cantoni, Jean Whiting, Dorothy Perkins, Katharine Lahey, Helen Brewer, 

Barbara Mellor, Marion McGinnis; 
Third Row, Francis Scheid, William Pearson, 

Charles Cooper, Warren Bradford 



Deane Beytes, Warren Strong, Bradford Martin, 



24 



THE PILGRIM 




WHERE PATIENCE 

IS PARAMOUNT 



COR three generations our old general 
store, about a mile from the town 
and one of New England's passing in- 
stitutions, has dispensed its "general 
merchandise and Yankee notions" to 
many and widely different types of cus- 
tomers. In its shabby, disorderly in- 
terior, amid a confusing array of all 
kinds of provisions and articles, can be 
found everything from baked beans to 
caviar, and from needles to mowing ma- 
chines; while through its ancient door 
have passed inhabitants of the "back 
woods" and those of Park Avenue. 

It was one of this latter type whose 
impressive limousine glided silently to 
a stop before our door late one October 
afternoon. Assisted gently by her 
chauffeur, a ponderous dowager labori- 
ously extricated herself from the luxur- 
ious interior, and proceeded slowly into 
the store, her fat, bejewelled fingers 
fumbling in her bag for a list. 

"Have you the sugar I telephoned 
for?" she demanded in a high, authori- 
tative voice. 

"Yes," my father smiled, "we had to 
send to Boston for it, but — " 

"All right," broke in Mrs. Frederick 
Long Hamilton, Sr., sharply, "how much 
is it?" 

"The pound box is seven cents," he 
replied. 

"Seven cents!" shrilled the outraged 
one raising an indignant lorgnette. 
"Mercy! I can purchase perfectly good 
sugar at the Super Sanitary Service 
System for five and one half cents." 

"Yes, but Pierce's is better quality, 
and has to be — " 

"Very well, I shall take it since my 
sister will use nothing else," she said 
resignedly, as though performing some 
noble service. "I shall now look at your 
tea biscuits." 

"We have these kinds in bulk," said 
my father, indicating a rack of large, 
glass-covered boxes, which Mrs. Hamil- 
ton surveyed through the lorgnette 
as if they were garbage. "And the 



assorted ones in packages," he contin- 
ued, taking one from the shelf. 

The lady seemed slightly more inter- 
ested, turning the package over and 
eyeing the label suspiciously. He tore 
off the cellophane wrapper, and', open- 
ing the box, extended it to her. Gingerly 
she tasted one, but placed it on the 
counter shaking her head, "Too sweet". 
Four other kinds were opened which 
were either too salty, too rich, too 
chocolate, and always too expensive. 

"Perhaps Mr. Bailey across the 
street — " began my father. 

"Never mind," coldly. "The Super- 
Sanitary Service System will have what 
I want." 

Seventeen of the thirty-one brands of 
coffee were scrutinized and discussd. 
This one would not keep you awake at 
night, this one was dated, that one was 
advertised on the radio, this one va- 
cuum-packed. The final decision was 
the standard brand sold by the chain 
store. 

At the end of thirty minutes, the 
counter was heaped high with various 
provisions. Mrs. Hamilton brought the 
lorgnette into play once more and 
scanned her list. "I believe that will be 
all," she said. "Now let me see. What 
have I bought?" 

"The sugar," said my father. "Seven 
cents." 

"Well," she said regretfully, drawing 
out a leather check book, "I had in- 
tended to buy all my goods here so I 
brought no money with me." And she 
proceeded to make out a check to herself 
for ten dollars. "Will you cash this, 
please?" she demanded, handing it to 
him. 

Puzzled, he opened the cash register 
and pawed about for small bills. 

"Oh, — and you may deliver the 
sugar," she added. "We're still at the 
summer place in Manomet, you know." 

Yes, he knew. — It was five miles 
down there. Profit on sugar one and one 
half cents ; cost of gasoline — oh, well — . 
He handed her the money. 

"Thank you. They accept only cash 
at the Super-Sanitary Service System, 
you know." 

Charles Cooper '35 



THE PILGRIM 



25 



SICK LEAVE 



§ERGEANT O'Malley of the Military 
Police was on sick leave. Jostling 
through the slowly-moving crowd on the 
Rue de Montin in the French holiday re- 
sort, he reached his destination, a com- 
fortably-shaded seat overlooking the 
bay, from which he could view the 
promenade and the beach. 

Civilian clothes, merrymakers, and 
brilliant sunshine combined to create an 
enjoyable atmosphere for the sergeant, 
whose proximity to the front lines had 
caused an intense dislike of jarring 
clamor. So, established contentedly, he 
contemplated the antics of "crazy for- 
eigners." 

A slight disturbance in a cafe not far 
distant from his seat attracted his at- 
tention for a few seconds, but he dis- 
missed it with a shrug ; the Frog police 
could look after these affairs. He was 
suddenly aroused by a stream of Gallic 
invectives, evidently hurled at an Irish- 
man. Before he could rise to his feet, he 
heard the fight begin. 

He rolled his ponderous bulk to the 
entrance of the cafe. From this vantage 
point he observed with extreme pleasure 
the sight of a corpulent Irishman pum- 
meling an irate French poilu. In an- 
other part of the cafe, tables were over- 
turned as half a dozen Irishmen and 
Frenchmen were disputing possession 
of a roll of bills. The battle raged 
noisily, each side giving and receiving 
severe punishment. 

Gendarmes, unable to quell the dis- 
turbance, were waiting for it to finish 
before making arrests. 

With dismay O'Malley saw his fellow- 
Hibernian being overwhelmed. Unable 
to restrain himself further, he uttered a 
Celtic yell and plunged into the fray. 
With his aid, the Irish rallied and routed 
their opponents. 

The hostilities over, the gendarmes 
proceeded to perform their duties. See- 
ing this, the Irishmen became glum. Ten 
days in the "jug" had no attractions for 
them. Once again O'Malley saved the 
situation. Presenting his credentials as 
sergeant of the military police, he in- 
sisted on taking as his prisoners the 
Irishmen who had figured in the brawl. 
Since this was satisfactory to the gen- 
darmes, he led his band of bruised 
brawlers in the direction of army head- 
quarters, but once safely out of sight of 
the gendarmes, he set free his prisoners, 



then proceeded on his way. He whistled 
blithely as he went along. 

O'Malley was happy. O'Malley was on 
sick leave. 

J. Louden '35 



PERUSING THE ADS 



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Madeline Bernardo '35 



EXULTATION 

Exultation in the wind, 
Exultation in the sea, 
Youth and freedom, love and glory, 
Mingle interchangeably. 

Pure delight in life and living, 
Simple joy in nature's things; 
Stars and sun and moon together 
Love I more than gold and kings. 

M. E. McGinnis '35 



26 



THE PILGRIM 



JUNIOR OPINIONS 
On A Variety of Subjects 



WINDOWS 



J-JOW significant are the things seen at 
windows by passers-by ! Signs of 
life are emitted from every window 
from early morning to late at night. 
Bedding and curtains flap wildly from 
the open windows. Flower boxes filled 
with colorful blossoms make ornate the 
sills, and now and then a child's tousled 
head can be seen peering curiously over 
a window-sill. Two women leaning 
from their windows gossip merrily in 
the morning sunshine with, perhaps, a 
rug or a mop in hand. From other win- 
dows come shrieks from radios or the 
sound of quarreling children or their 
gay laughter and chatter. A cat basks 
in the sunlight, while an ice card is 
perched at an angle above his head. Oc- 
casionally a trilling and chirping is 
heard from a pert canary. 

As one goes on into the shopping dis- 
trict, various displays in windows im- 
mediately catch the eye. Perhaps there 
is beautiful finery or delicious edibles, 
both attractive to the eye. 

Passing a factory, one sees people in- 
dustriously engaged at machinery, 
working steadily and unceasingly. As 
one glances upward, he catches a 
glimpse of a dentist's uniform and 
thanks his lucky stars that he is on the 
outside looking in. 

As twilight gathers, the last pink rays 
of sun are reflected in the thous- 
ands of windows, and, as darkness 
arrives, twinkling lights gleam from 
every window signifying at least life — 
be it sad or pleasant. 

Dorothy Perkins '36 



SHOES 



^fE don't think of them often, unless 
they happen to be too small, but 
they offer an interesting train of 
thought to the one who does stop to 
think about them. 

When the first cave man wrapped a 
skin about his foot, he started the de- 
velopment of one of our most necessary 
articles of apparel. What costume 
would be complete without footgear to 
complete it? 

Likewise, much can be told about a 
person from the shoes he wears. In the 



thirteenth century, shoes were soft and 
pointed; the longer the points, the 
higher the social position of the wearer. 
In fact, the points of the ultra-fashion- 
able soon grew so long that they had to 
be tied to the knees to prevent the per- 
son from tripping over them. Though 
these extremes are no longer seen, shoes 
are still an index to social position. 

For instance, in a subway car, facing 
the opposite seat which extends the 
length of the car, I can tell something 
of the people across the aisle even 
though most of them are hidden by 
newspapers. This tired pair of dust- 
caked broughans indicates a day of hard 
work well done, while the quiet, low- 
heeled, black pumps beside them suggest 
a shop-girl who has been on her feet for 
hours. They keep crossing and uncros- 
sing/trying to find the least tiring 
position. Next in line is a tiny, frivo- 
lous pair of patent-leather pumps with 
extremely high heels. We know without 
further thought the type of girl to 
whom these belong. A sturdy pair of 
moccasins is next. The woman who 
wears these has no patience with the 
French heels and paper-thin soles of her 
neighbor. She has sacrificed style for 
comfort and is the better for it. This 
meticulously-shined pair of Oxfords 
looks much like many other pairs be- 
longing to business men, but what dif- 
ferent stories they could tell ! 

Last is a pair of broken-toed, scarred 
shoes that are sprawled wearily in a cor- 
ner of the car. These shoes have tramped 
the streets daily and propped themselves 
on park benches nightly for a long time. 

Shoes must have pleasure, too. One 
can almost envy the old pair that sinks 
into the fragrant, just-thawed earth of 
the garden in springtime, and dodges 
the inevitable puddles that come in the 
loveliest time of year. There are the 
sandals that bury themselves in the fine 
sand of the beach, and the moccasins 
that sink into the forest's aged carpet 
of pine needles, not to mention the 
slippers that are toasted before the fire 
in the evening when the day is dying. 
Yes, shoes must have pleasure, too. 

Priscilla Roberts '36 



ON HAVING THE GRIPPE 



THE grippe, as you probably have dis- 
covered, is one of the pointless afflic- 
tions of a human being. Even the joys 
of being lazy in bed are dispelled by its 
headaches and weariness. It comes on 
suddenly to most people, although the 



THE PILGRIM 



27 



tired and scrappy you of yesterday may 
have been a symptom. 

The day on which you first get the 
grippe is begun as usual. You come 
down to breakfast feeling at odds with 
the world. After one look at your weary 
face, someone feels your forehead and 
says rather decisively, "Better stay in 
bed to-day. You don't want to be sick, 
you know." 

In vain you listlessly remonstrate 
about the amount of work you'll have to 
make up if you're absent; nevertheless, 
it's rather a relief to go off to bed. Once 
there with a pile of books beside you as 
a sop to your conscience, you lack even 
the ambition to pick them up. You lie 
too weary even to look at anything. 
Your head seems about to split. All in- 
terest or anxiety concerning the work 
you'll miss flies. For a few days you lie 
there, not even eating, for who wants 
to eat when he has the grippe ? 

After two or three days, you recover, 
or so the doctor says, and sit up weakly 
in a chair. By this time you really feel 
as though you could read a few pages 
and nibble at some food. After three 
days of this, you decide that you'd 
better return to school or the work 
you've missed will be too much for you 
to conquer. Lacking ambition, you 
return. 

The make-up work and your regular 
work almost send you back to bed. You 
struggle along, going to bed at eight 
o'clock every night and doing almost 
nothing. Yet slowly you recover from the 
attack, like the Irishman who was sick 
sixteen days after he got better. 

Elizabeth Belcher '36 



effect. When they have finished, the re- 
sult will probably not be at all like the 
original, but that doesn't matter. It is 
the satisfaction you get from being able 
to say, "I knitted a tarn." So, get your 
yarn and begin now. It's never too late. 

Elsie Monti '36 



THE KNITTING HABIT 



TT'S sweeping the country! Perhaps it 
is more appropriate to say it's wind- 
ing its way. Have you a ball of yarn in 
your home? If not, hasten to your 
favorite store, even the drug store will 
do, and get your supply now. Don't you 
know that it's very smart and ultra- 
modern to knit? Perhaps your ability 
dictates a five-inch pocket-book, but it 
serves its purpose. 

On wintry nights, gathered before a 
hot stove with faces burning and feet 
freezing, the feminine sex is repre- 
sented by all ages. Thirteen-year-old 
sister is making a tarn like the one that 
Greta Garbo wore in her latest picture, 
while her older sister, who is thirty-five- 
well, perhaps thirty, is making one like 
Shirley Temple's to obtain that youthful 



SECURITY 



Gazing at the moon, 

I fell asleep 

And dreamed. 

And in my dream 

Was horror — 

I knew not why! 

I woke 

Trembling with fright, 

And saw 

In the heavens above 

Serene and calm 

The moon. 

And seeing, 

Slept, 

And dreamed no more. 



Mary Goddard '36 



THE WIND'S CHALLENGE 

On a summer's night it whispers of 

moonlight on murmuring lagoons. 
It breathes a tale of pulsating life, 
Of a heaven laced with gold. 
I must go ; let me follow you ! 

On a stormy night it thunders of foam- 
ing seas and life's adventures. 

It beckons, the tumultuous spirit leaps 
high. 

But I am afraid — 

I must stay at home and envy you 
through my window. 

Virginia Wood '36 



SUNRISE 

A long line of golden light divides King 

Neptune's domain 
From the vast, immeasurable sky; 
Like a hungry flame, the sun creeps up 

into God's firmament 
To blaze down upon the turbulent sea. 

The white caps glisten like diamonds 
Under the rays of Nature's torch 

bearer ; 
The boisterous East Wind dashes the 

emerald waters 
Against the rocks along the beach, 
Throwing high a shower of spray — 
A glorious new day has come ! 

Priscilla McCosh '36 



28 



THE PILGRIM 



A NEW LITERARY GENIUS? 



"JTAY, have you ever heard of Ger- 
trude Stein?" 

"No, I don't think so. She isn't that 
new torch singer with Whiteman's is 
she?" 

"You don't know anything. Why 
Gertrude Stein is one of the foremost 
writers of the day. She's even consid- 
ered a genius by many of her readers. 
You think only of jazz orchestras." 

"Well, what does she write?" 

"Oh, she's marvelous — listen! 'What 
has my life in America been, it has been 
the doing of everything that I never 
have done. Never have done, never 
could have done, never could have done 
again, that is the way my life in 
America began and is begun and is go- 
ig on.' What do you think of that?" 

"Terrible — put on Rudy Vallee." 

"No, its about time you became in- 
terested in good literature. And, Ger- 
trude Stein beingone of the best, we shall 
begin with her. Now will you listen? T 
cannot believe that America has 
changed, many things have come and 
gone but not really come and not really 
gone but they are there and that per- 
haps does make the America that I left 
and the America I am to find different 
but not really dif— !' " 

"Stop! What is she trying to do? 
Make up her mind?" 

"Certainly not, stupid. She means 
that she finds America different but not 
really different." 

"Oh!" 

"Stop interrupting and listen and see 
if you can tell me what this means. 
And then it began. The doing every- 
thing that I had never done, and the 
liking doing everything everything any- 
thing that I had never done. That be- 
gan. And this is the way it began.' " 

"What does it mean?" 

"You're hopeless. It means she's go- 
ing to begin something." 

"Well, why beat around the bush a- 
bout it? Begin began I begun and began 
what begin to begun ! Why all the cere- 
mony?" 

"Because anybody can say T will be- 
gin', but not many can say it the way 
she does. Why, that's art." 

"Yeah? Well, I give up. Turn on 
Rudy Vallee." 

"No. I'll make you appreciate this if 
it takes years. Listen. And that is 
what America is, is and is and it is 
beautiful, beautiful in the American 
way, beautiful just in this way.' " 



"Oh! Is it? Then why all the repeti- 
tion?" 

"Because repetition is an art. There 
aren't many people who can use repe- 
tition and not bore the reader." 

"And you think Gertrude Stein can do 
it? Well, I don't. And don't you think 
I'm going to listen to more of that "art". 
I'd rather read Homer. Maybe I'd get 
something out of that. All I get from 
Gertrude Stein's writing is dizziness. 
Now will you please turn on Rudv 
Vallee?" 

"Now / give up." 

R. BONGIOVANNI '35 



THE DERELICT 



jyjARY Suber, stooped and middle- 
aged, earned her meager salary 
standing in half-lighted doorways in 
darkened slum districts gathering in- 
formation about the narcotics traffic. 
Her sallow, wrinkled face with its pierc- 
ing black, sorrowful eyes that once had 
been sparkling and happy, her pale, 
sneering lips, and her hollow cheeks 
which had long since lost the ruddy glow 
of youth were nearly hidden by a 
tangled mass of stringy, gray hair. She 
cared little for life. 

Some people thought Mary peculiar — - 
at least those did who thought of her at 
all. 

"A little gone up here!" they would 
exclaim with derision, pointing an un- 
kempt hand in the direction of their 
heads. 

Her income should have been larger, 
for her services were invaluable, but all 
Mary Suber wanted was just enough to 
live in the simplest way. Frequently she 
went to federal headquarters or to 
police stations with her reports, but the 
occupants of the boarding house sup- 
posed that she was on parole — as many 
of them were. Consequently they asked 
no questions when no explanations were 
offered. 

"Some day, boys," she often remarked 
to the police, "I'll get mine. This sure is 
a dangerous game." 

Mary Suber was bitter, hard, cynical ; 
the world had been very cruel to her. 
Once she, too, had been happy, unbeliev- 
ably happy. It had frightened her to 
have had so much — a fine husband, a 
sturdy little son all their own, a modest 
home, and the prospects of a gloriously 
happy future. Mary's husband had been 
employed in the same business in which 
she now found herself. It hadn't seemed 
very dangerous then; in fact, he had 

Continued on pgae 30 



THE PILGRIM 



29 



Sophomore Poetry Page 



"WHEN DO I MISS YOU MOST?" 

When do I miss you most? 

It's hard to say 

Whether it be at morning light 

Or close of day ; 

I see the books you used to love, 

I hear a song — 

And grief beats on my lonely heart 

Its deadly gong. 

When do I miss you most? 

I do not know : 

Whether I think of you or not 

My heart will go 

Along the ways we used to love 

In sad regret ; 

I miss you most whene'er I try, 

Dear, to forget. 

J. O'Keeffe '37 



MOON 

Slowly and majestically with great ar- 
gent shield 

She climbs to her throne in the heavens ; 

Long shafts of silver rays 

Illuminate a garden rare, 

Turning the fountain spray 

Into a misty white veil. 

The lady of the skies looks benignly 
down, 

Beaming soft radiance over all, 

Sending forth her golden wealth, 

Spinning a web of moon glory 

Around the earthlings below, 

Turning the world 

Into enchantment. 

Louise Pierson '37 



THE HIKER 

Broad roads, narrow roads — roads that 

twist and twine, 
Winding like a ribbon through the oak 

and pine, 
Up hill, down vale, by the lonely sea, — 
Little paths of heart's delight calling 

out to me : 

Wanderlust's a heritage — rain and wind 
and shine, 

Byways and highways ever shall be 
mine, 

Up dell, down dale, by moor and mire 
and burn, — 

Where the heart holds festival, wander- 
ing feet will return. 

Hazel Cleary '37 



SUNSET 

Purple and gold the setting sun 
Sinks down o'er the peaceful sea, 
And into the heart of a lonely one 
Comes peace and tranquillity. 

For the day with all its cares and 

strife 
Fades with that calming sight ; 
And the heart that bears the burdens 

of life 
Is eased and at once made light. 

Elda Guaraldi '37 



THE SONG 

I heard a note like the thrush's song 
Floating on the silent air, 

'Mid the dazzling light 

Of the sun so bright, — 
And the singer was young and fair. 

But though she sang with a voice of 

gold, 
She could not hold me long, 

And to my heart 

No joy could impart, — 
For her soul was not in her song. 

Frances Wirzburger '37 



30 



THE PILGRIM 



Continued from page 28 
seldom mentioned it at home. But one 
day he was brought home to her riddled 
with bullets, his handsome, young face 
smeared with blood and his clothes 
stained with dark blotches. 

"Knew too much," sympathized the 
old Irish policeman in his own brusk 
way. "They always get it if they do." 

It was as though death had come to 
Mary herself. Her spirit was broken, her 
cheery smile waned, but even then she 
was determined to be happy for the 
sake of her tiny son. 

The little house was soon taken from 
her by foreclosure, but undaunted, she 
kept on ; hard work she feared not. The 
baby became a fine strong boy. Mary 
loved to have him with her. She almost 
worshipped him — perhaps too much for 
his own good. After a hard day of 
scrubbing and cleaning in downtown 
offices, she was content to sit and 
watch him. But he was selfish, thought- 
lessly selfish. He gave less and less of 
his time to his weary mother, almost 
shutting her from his life altogether. 
He seldom stayed at home, became 
moody, sometimes boisterous and gay, 
more often tired and depressed. When 
he joined an unprincipled group of 
boys, advice was not for him, and it was 
for a second time in Mary's life that her 
heart bled when her son was brought 
home to her hopelessly ill from an over- 
dose of a drug to which he had fallen 
victim. 

For a long time after his death noth- 
ing mattered to Mary. Her soul cried 
out for revenge on the cruel world which 
had taken both husband and son, but 
she was too weary and tired with life 
to go on. Her faith in mankind was 
utterly destroyed. God had forsaken 
her. Perhaps a bit of the real Mary 
showed itself unconquered when she 
offered herself to the police in the war 
against the drug traffic. And so for the 
last twelve years she has been successful 
in her mission. 

"There's a leak somewhere," the 

peddlers would say, never suspecting 

the poor shabby woman standing in the 

doorway. "Someone's in with the cops." 

Jean Whiting '36 



AVE MARIA 



"A VE Maria >" softly intoned the choir 
from the depths of the great 
cathedral. 

"Hail Mary," she echoed reverently, 
remembering another Mary, a Mary 



who was tall, slim, dauntless, a Mary 
who had won every battle except the one 
with death. 

"Dear Mary," she whispered with 
head bowed on the altar rail, "dear 
Mary, I've tried so hard. Really, I have. 
I've worked, worked hard, Mary, when I 
was sick, tired, weary. All for little 
Joey who kneels beside me, that he, 
your son, might have the chance denied 
to you and me. It hasn't been easy. The 
world is cruel to an old woman. If John 
had lived, he might have helped us. But 
he loved you. Better for him that he died 
beneath the wheels of an automobile 
than to blunder through life without 
you. Ah, but Mary, when you left this 
little son in my care — you didn't — 
know — didn't know that gradually he 
was becoming deaf. Day by day his 
hearing fades. Ah, God, that this 
bright, eager child should some day 
never hear ! And I helpless to save him ! 
My pitiful earnings can never pay for 
treatments which might save him! I 
could give him to the state. He would be 
provided for. But I love him so! That 
bright hair, those blue eyes, they're 
yours and mine ! Without them life has 
no meaning. While I live, I can not give 
him. up." 

The gloom is bitter-sweet with incense. 
Red tapers, like liquid rubies, burn be- 
neath the huge crucifix. A wandering 
finger of light reveals a calla lily. 

Joey, his elfin face alight with eager- 
ness, drank in the beauty and magnifi- 
cence of the great church. For the 
moment, all else sank into oblivion. 

Tenderly she lifted her hand as if to 
stroke the yellow hair. In mid-air it 
stopped, dropped to her side. With quick 
resolve she arose silently and swiftly 
made her way down the dim aisle. Joey 
gazed enraptured at a massive statue of 
Mary with the child. He had not heard 
her leave. 

Straight down the ponderous stone 
steps she marched. No backward 
glances, no faltering. Out into the grey 
street, strangely quiet after the clamor- 
ous day of business, she went. On she 
walked rapidly. More slowly, more 
slowly now she went. 

"No crying now. No regrets," she ad- 
monished herself. "Father Murphy will 
understand. He'll see that Joey goes to 
the institution. He'll see that Joey gets 
his treatments. He'll — " 

The moan of a foghorn interrupts her 
hysterical thoughts. The wind blows 
damp across the river where crushed 
souls and broken hearts pause for one last 
precious moment — then are forever 



THE PILGRIM 



31 



gone from this world. The fog rolls in, 
lights gleam faintly in the murk, sweet, 
sweet the chimes float on the air, a dog 
wails, Ave Maria. 

Alba Martinelli '36 



THE ALUMNI DANCE 



TT seems as if there are hundreds of old 

grads here, but maybe it's because 
they are all doing such different steps 
that they seem so numerous. 

There is Buddy Martin doing the 
Mass. Tech. The poor boy, he's having 
a hard time. 

Over in the corner Gillie Andrews is 
teaching Carlo Guidaboni the Tufts 
Toddle — tricky trotting, we'd say. 

'Way over on the west side of the hall 
(she runs to western places) is Ruth 
Buttner demonstrating the Oberlin 
Amble. 

Warren Sampson is doing the Spring- 
field Sprint down the center of the hall, 
and bumping into the Bridgewater 
Bouncers, Jeanette Martin, Dot Per- 
kins, and Shirley Dutton. 



And look at the "Professor" ! He's do- 
ing the Boston University — oh, I beg 
your pardon, he isn't doing it any more. 

Marjorie Belcher is conquering the 
latest of the latest dance steps, The 
Mount Holyoke Hobble. 

Just coming on to the floor are Ruth 
Murphy and Peggy Raymond. They 
swing into the LaSalle Loop with a 
grace that only they can attain. 

Leroy Schrieber has been shuffling 
around the hall with the Moses Brown 
Bustle, and he is doing very well for 
himself. 

And over in front of the arches, too, 
there is that shuffling Simmons' girl, 
Elizabeth Wood, trying to show Florence 
Armstrong that the New Hampshire 
Hop doesn't equal Dot Holmes' Vermont 
State Stamp. 

Alyce Bussolari and Mary Riley are 
demonstrating the Chandler version of 
the Continental. 

What a dance ! But within a few years 
they'll be dancing more conservative 
steps to more quiet music. Time does 
that to all of us. 




MASSASOIT CHAPTER OF THE NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 

First Row, Dorothy Perkins, Miss Doris Carey, faculty sponsor, Flora Fortini, Marjorie Cantoni, 
Rarbara Mellor, Helen Brewer, Lucy Holmes, Anna Goldbergh 

Second Row, Jean Beytes, Jean Whiting, Elizabeth Ryan, Elizabeth Belcher, Katharine Lahey, 
Elizabeth Mordt, Lucy Mayo, Alba Martinelli, Reatriee Dube 

■Third Row, Anthony Caramello, Vincent Baietti, Charles Maccal'erri, Deane Beytes, Albert Albertini, 
James Louden, Charles Cooper 



32 



THE PILGRIM 




lUnbn % ffltjttp Cupola 



A little news from there 
A little news from here 
To recall to memory 
The highlights of the year. 

Having passed successfully (that is in 
some respects) through a year marked 
by tornadoes, floods, and sand storms we 
have finally reached the month of brides 
and graduates. Let us stay Father 
Time's hand and gaze into his hour 
glass that we may see what the last 
school year has left with us. 

Student Activity Society, step for- 
ward and receive a resounding kiss on 
both cheeks for those fine assemblies. 
Let's see — oh, of course you remember 
Peter Walter's marvelous performance 
when Mr. Walters repeated his success 
of last year. Then, too, we must not for- 
get Mr. Dyer whose clever talk on 
Europe accompanied Mr. Walter's in- 
spired renditions. 

Shades of Uriah Heep! Remember 
Dr. Frank Armitage of England who 
gave impersonations of characters 
from Dickens'? That was a perfect 
assembly ! 

As for Hans Helm of Columbia Uni- 
versity, well — we're still groping for 
adjectives. His impersonations of musi- 
cal instruments done entirely with his 
throat and vocal chords were marvel- 
ous, to say the least! His lullaby in a 
soprano voice nearly brought down the 
assembly hall roof. 

Then there was Mr. Edward Henefy^s 
address on Washington and Lincoln. His 
vocabulary left even our lofty (not to 
mention haughty) seniors gasping for 
air and a dictionary. 

Ernest Johnson's performance was 
the great success that every one ex- 
pected it to be. 

Can you remember Mai Cameron, 
great mystifier, illusionist, et al? This 
performance helped to swell the trea- 
sury of the S. A. S. 



The fortunate S. A. S. members made 
trips to Fall River and Yarmouth to 
Student Society conventions. Also we 
must not forget to mention the Kingston 
and Weymouth conventions of the 
Southeastern Massachusetts League of 
School Publications (we dare you to say 
that in one breath!) which the Pilgrim 
staff attended. 

Prick up your ears, dancers and 
would-be dancers. You don't have to be 
reminded of the senior get-togethers. 
This novel way of teaching the terpsi- 
chorean art to beginners was enthusi- 
astically received. 

Miss Wilber and her Latin Club tore 
themselves away from Vergil long 
enough to visit the Boston Museum of 
Fine Arts and, incidentally, the famous 
Ice Carnival. 

"H. M. S. Pinafore" and her load of 
romantic sailors and tripping maidens 
will long be remembered- Long will Dick 
Deadeye (Boooooo) continue to haunt 
our dreams. Great thanks are due Mr. 
Albertin and Miss Locklin for their un- 
tiring work. 

A uniform school ring has been 
chosen by vote of the three lower classes. 
(It is interesting to note that no Pil- 
grim, Plymouth Rock, or Mayflower 
adorns our choice.) 

Congratulations to the new members 
of the Honor Society! The proud sen- 
iors are : Jean Beytes, Katharine Lahey, 
Beatrice Dube, Elizabeth Mordt, Charles 
Cooper, Charles Maccaferri, Albert 
Albertini, James Louden, and Anthony 
Caramello. The happy juniors are: 
Lucy Mayo, Dorothy Perkins, Elizabeth 
Ryan, Elizabeth Belcher, Jean Whiting, 
Alba Martinelli, Vincent Baietti, and 
Deane Beytes. 

If you were among the bus loads of 
basketball fans who went to Bridge- 
water, Rockland, and Brockton in sup- 



THE PILGRIM 



33 



port of the team, you don't need to be 
reminded of the fine times we had. 

Two faculty members, Miss McDon- 
ald and Mrs. Buck, have resigned this 
year. To them go our thanks for their 
faithful service. To their successors, 
Miss Swett and Mr. Albertin, we extend 
a welcome. 

We mourn the deaths of Miss Faith 
Stalker and Mr. Frank E. Fash. They 
will be long remembered at P. H. S. 

And now, as in everything, there 
comes the end. (Did you sigh with re- 
lief?) Oh, well, "Tout est bien qui est 
fini bien" — as Miss Carey says. 
A Tantot, 

News Editors 



EXCERPTS 

FROM "THE ATTEMPT" 

P. H. S. PUBLICATION 

OF MARCH 15, 1845 



The following are excerpts from some 
copies of the P. H. S>. publication "The 
Attempt", dated 1845. These interest- 
ing old notebooks, written entirely in 
longhand by the boys of the school, were 
kindly loaned to us by Mrs. George 
Snow. 

LOVING! 



Loving is a painful thrill, 
But not to love — more painful still 
But surely 'tis the worst of pain, 
That loving, we're not loved again. 

— Radical 



THE SCHOOLBOY IS CRUSHED 



Yes, this is but too true. The school- 
boy, even in this "land of the free, 
where none do bow the knee to tyrant's 
power", is degraded, almost, I might say 
to a level with the brutes. He is under 
the absolute control of his master who- 
ever he may be and has no power to do 
anything but to get lessons, and write 
foolish compositions (like the present 
one. ) Before they talk about abolishing 
slavery at the south let people of Plym- 
outh take a walk up Russell Street and 
see what they can do for the two hun- 
dred slaves they have got cooped up in 
that great building on the left hand side 
of the road, and see whether their over- 
seers keep them sleek and fat as they 
ought etc, etc. The building above re- 
ferred to is built a little above the other 
jail (which is made of stone,) as if to 



tantalize the inhabitants of the former 
edifice by the sight of its beautiful stone 
walls, the inside of which, but two to my 
knowledge have ever been able to see. If 
some few benevolent persons wish the 
town to give these school-boy slaves the 
liberty of the yard on Wednesday after- 
noon some other malevolent gentlemen 
( ?) are afraid that the ladies will be 
troubled by "little dirty brats" prowling 
about the streets, and for this reason 
they are confined on that day also in 
their dismal dungeon. But when the 
railroad comes everything is going to be 
changed and we hope that a change will 
take place in this respect as well as 
others. 

— W. Goodwin 



THE WIDOW AND HER SON! 



'Twas midnight! Fierce howled the 
storm around the cottage door 
Loud did the thunder peal, and 
bright the lightning flash, 
When from her home a hapless widow 
strayed 
To seek her only one, her dear, dear 
son. 

Though dark the night, though steep the 
road, 
Awhile she wandered in the wood 
At last fatigued and drenched with rain, 
She fainted, but by the hand of God 
revived again. 

And rising from the ground she blessed 
him who thus had saved, 
Beseeching him that if she fell a vic- 
tim to the storm 
That he might save her only son; 

Then onward through the woods she 
made her way. 

At last as by an angelic vision she de- 
scried 
Far in the bosom of the wood, a dim 
but steady light. 
Oh, who can tell the joy of that poor 
anxious mother 
When first that dim light she 
descried. 

And then she made her way o'er the hill 
and dale, 
But never reached it, no never 
reached 
For on her way, from a high precipitous 
rock she fell. 
Doomed never to rise on earth again. 

— H. Gleason 



34 



THE PILGRIM 




FOREIGN, 



LANGUVGES 



EN VOYAGE 



II me semble que je n'oublierai jamais 
le voyage interessant sur la Mediter- 
ranee et 1'Ocean Atlantique que j'ai fait 
il y a quelques ans. 

Je me rappelle encore, dans mon es- 
prit, les sentiments que j'avais quand il 
me fallait quitter mes cheres amies. Je 
me souviens comme j'etais triste en voy- 
ant ma patrie, si bien aimee, disparaitre 
de vue peu a peu. 

Alors, pendant plus de deux semaines, 
on ne pouvait voir que l'eau et le ciel ; 
bleus tous les deux. 

D'abord, je savais qu'il me fallait 
faire la connaissance de mes nouveaux 
amis, si je voulais etre aussi heureuse 
que je 1'avais ete. Plusieurs de ces nou- 
veaux amis etaient assez interessants ; 
ainsi, je regrettais de devoir les aband- 
onner a la fin du voyage. 

Maintenant, quand je ra: rappelle les 
orages menacants qu'il y avait, je souris 
heureusement. Un de ces orages etait in- 
supportable. II a eclate pres du rivage 
de l'ltalie. Inquiets et effrayes, nous 
avions a peine 1'espoir d'etre sauves. 
Quelques-uns de mes amis, etant deven- 
us tres chagrants s'inquietaient ; pend- 
ant que d'autres, comme moi, etaient 
restes gais, meme dansant sur les vagues 
montagneuses. 

Les panoramas qui s'offrent a la vue 
au milieu de la mer sont magnifiques. 

Presque tous les jours, vers six heures 
du matin, j'aimais quitter ma chambre 
pour aller sur le pont, ou je pouvais 
prendre l'air frais. Je surveillais la 
splendeur du soleil comme il se levait 
petit a petit de la profondeur de la mer. 
Tout etait tranquille; les vagues seuls 
ne cessaient jamais de deranger le 
calme. 

Aussi le soir, j'allais au meme endroit, 
le pont, quand il faisait tres noir. Je ne 




pouvais voir que les astres d'or qui 
etincelaient dans le ciel sombre. En- 
chantee par la beaute de tout, j'enten- 
dais les vagues ecumeuses, eclabousser 
contre le bateau; je me souviens bien 
que ces vagues m'effrayaient toujours 
pendant la nuit. 

Oh, pour etre en voyage encore une 
fois! 

Anna Goldbergh '35 



A L'ECOLE SUPERIEURE 



Je me rappelle tres clairement un 
jour au commencement du mois de sep- 
tembre, mil neuf cent trente et un quand 
je me suis mise en route pour l'ecole 
superieure avec mon amie. Les vacances 
etaient finies, et il fallait que je com- 
mence mes etudes encore une fois. 

Que j'etais heureuse ce jour-la! Je me 
sentais fiere et grande parce que j'allais 
a l'ecole superieure pour la premiere 
fois. 

C'etait une belle journee, je m'en sou- 
viens. Le soleil brillait, mais il ne faisait 
pas trop chaud. Tout le monde me sem- 
blait heureux, meme les petits enfants, 
riants et bavardants, qui allaient a 
l'ecole pour la premiere fois. 

Quand j'etais pres de l'ecole que 
j'avais quittee il y avait presque trois 
mois, je l'ai regardee tristement. Alors 
j'ai tourne mes yeux vers un batiment 
de briques rouges qui devait m'abriter 
quatre annees. 

A peine entree, on m'a conduite vers 
une salle dans laquelle j'etudie le fran- 
cais maintenant. Cela devait etre ma 
salle de classe cette annee. 

Apres quelques semaines, je me suis 
habituee a ma nouvelle vie, mes maitres, 
et mes etudes, J'avais decide de faire 
de mon mieux, coute que coute. 

Je suis le cours commercial, c'est a 
dire que j'etudie la dactylographie, la 



THE PILGRIM 



35 



stenographic, aussi l'anglais et le fran- 
cais. II n'est pas neoessaire que j'etudie 
ie francais mais je suis ce cours parce 
que je 1'aime et je veux savoir quelques 
choses de oe pays pittoresque. 

Maintenant je suis arrivee a ma dern- 
iere annee de cette ecole. Bientot il faut 
que je dise adieu a mes etudes, mes amis, 
et toute l'ecole. Je dois donner ma place 
a d'autres eleves. J'espere seulement 
que ces quatres ans passes ici m'ont pre- 
paree a bien reussir dans l'avenir. 

F. FORTINI '35 



LE PAUVRE HOMME 



Le garde-magasin a demande a son 
aide un soir. 

"Qui a achete les six oeufs qui n'etai- 
ent pas frais?" 

"Madame Brown," lui a repondu 
l'aide." 

"Et qui a achete le pain et le gateau 
qui n'etaient pas frais?" 

"Madame Brown," l'aide a repondu. 
"Etes^-vous malade? Vous etes si pale." 

"Non, je ne suis pas malade mainten- 
ant mais je le serai parce que nous de- 
vons avoir le the avec elle se soir." 

Marjorie Cantoni '35 



UNE BONNE RAISON 



La septieme classe commenca a neuf 
heunes moins un quart. A neuf heunes 
precises un petit garcon, qui etait sou- 
vent en retard, entra lentement dans la 
salle de classe. 

Le professeur le regarda un moment 
et puis elle lui dit. 

"Eh bien, Jacques, pourquoi etes- 
vous en retard ce matin?" 

"II y a une ensiegne a cote de la rue 
qui dit: L' EGOLE, ALLEZ LENTE- 
MENT, et je faisais ce qu'elle dit," re- 
pondit le garcon. 

Jean Beytes '35 



EGO 

TN Latin "Ego" was simply a pronoun 
meaning "I". Slowly through the 
years we have derived from this pro- 
noun such words as "egotism", "egotis- 
tic", and "ego", all implying conceit and 
selfishness. An egotistic person is self- 
centered. Materially this type may pro- 
gress far, for he pushes himself ahead 
and attains his desires, but spiritually 
he can pass no tests. 

I suspect that "Ego" was translated 
in that manner by the old monks, for 



they were learned men who had sworn 
to forego worldly pleasures and spend 
their lives in the most worthwhile ways. 
Highest of all these aspirations was to 
forget themselves, to drive "ego" from 
their minds. They were taught to hold 
the greatest of contempt for self-cen- 
tered persons. Thus, perhaps, they 
coined these words, labeling the selfish, 
egotistic. 

Harrie Mordt '36 



THE STORY OF WORDS 



Undoubtedly, at some time or other, 
you have studied the growth of a flower, 
a tree, or an insect, but have you ever 
studied the growth of a word? Usually, 
after many years its original meaning 
is lost. 

For instance, the word "infant" has 
an interesting derivation. "In" meaning 
"un" or "not" in Latin, combined with 
"fari," meaning "to speak," were com- 
bined to make "infans" which means, 
literally, "not speaking," "a babe." "In- 
fans" in turn has become our word "in- 
fant." 

"Inaugurate" comes from the word 
"auger", the highest member of omen 
interpreters ; the verb "inaugare" means 
"to take omens", and from the past par- 
ticiple "inauguratus" comes "inaugu- 
rate." 

"Candidate" is derived from the Latin 
word "candidus" meaning "glittering," 
"white." When a man in ancient Rome 
was campaigning for an office, he wore 
a white toga and was called a "candida- 
tus", "one clothed in white." 

"Companion" has an interesting his- 
tory. The Latin word "com" meaning 
"with" and "panis" meaning "bread" 
were joined to form "companion", lit- 
erally meaning "one who shares bread 
with another." 

"Congregation" comes from the Latin 
"grex", a "herd" or "flock" and the 
verb "congregare", "to gather into a 
flock." From the past participle, "con- 
gregatus," "congregation" is easily de- 
rived. 

"Pastor" is derived from the Latin 
verb "pascere," meaning "to pasture," 
and from its past participle "pastum" 
came our word "pastor." 

Therefore, we are greatly indebted to 
Latin for our vocabulary since many of 
our words originated in Rome, "the 
eternal city." 

Elsie Monti '36 



36 



THE PILGRIM 




"The Parrot" 
Rockland High School 
Rockland, Mass. 

Your method of introducing your 
staff is very good. Your Junior High 
page will train the younger students for 
later service on "The Parrot." 

"The Semaphore" 
Stoughton, Mass. 

Although your magazine is small, 
you have assembled some interesting 
material. An editorial entitled "On 
Collecting Material" by a Former Staff 
Member was well done. Your Athletic 
Department is one of the best. 

"The Blue 0%vl" 
Attleboro High School 
Attleboro, Mass. 

Your magazine is well arranged. The 
cover design is clever, and the cartoons 
are excellent. 

"The Reflector" 
Weymouth High School 
Weymouth, Mass. 

Your Christmas issue is very fine, 
especially the cover design and the 
"Snoops" column. 

"Sachem" 

Memorial High School 

Middleboro, Mass. 

Your literary and poetry sections 
show the active interest of the students. 
The cover design in orange and brown 
is very striking. 

"The Harpoon" 
Dartmouth High School 
North Dartmouth, Mass. 

Your Senior issue is worthy of praise. 
The photographs of the Seniors and 
comments upon them are very well done. 

"The Climber" 
Howard High School 
West Bridgewater, Mass. 

Your literary department is very 
good. It contains an editorial entitled 
"Spring Fever" which P. H. S. Seniors 
should read. 



"The Ferncliff Echo" 
Lee High School 
Lee, Mass. 

Every one of your departments is ex- 
cellent with the exception of the Ex- 
change Column, which we think is some- 
what weak, but the Foreign Language 
Department is a vital part of your pub- 
lication, a thing not always true of high 
school publications. 

"The Unquity Echo" 
Milton High School 
Milton, Mass. 

The editorial "Men or Sheep" by Jack 
Gisburne is well written and the Litera- 
ture Department as a whole is very 
interesting. "Jokes" is an entertaining 
department. A few more editorials 
would also lend interest to your maga- 
zine. 

"The Partridge" 
Duxbury, Mass. 

Your paper is very readable, especial- 
ly the column entitled "Just an Earful." 
It is a very clever way of presenting 
school news. The jokes and sport de- 
partments are fine. A few more good 
book reviews would improve your al- 
ready fine magazine. 

"The Eagle" 
Kingston, Mass. 

Your paper is very compact yet com- 
prehensive. It is a real news sheet. 

"TO THE PILGRIM" FROM: 

"Song Pointer" 
Provincetown, Mass. 

"The Pilgrim" is most entertaining 
and contains many original ideas. 
"Parting Shots" and "The Class Will" 
are both clever and amusing. 

"Chronicle" 

South Paris High School 

South Paris, Maine 

"The Pilgrim" is a fine paper. Your 
Foreign Language and Alumni Depart- 
ments are particularly good, and your 
art is clever. Continued on page 41 



THE PILGRIM 



37 




HOLD THAT LINE! 



The past football season was consid- 
ered a fair one for Plymouth High 
School. The team won two, tied two, and 
lost three games. 

In mid-season Kingston issued a 
challenge to Plymouth for a post-season 
game and Plymouth accepting the chal- 
lenge, administered a twenty-one to six 
beating much to the delight of the 
players and school followers. This was 
one of the reasons Plymouth's season 
can be classed as a success although the 
number of games won was not too im- 
pressive. 

Chief Bagnall was hindered by in- 
juries to some of the players and also by 
having some failures in studies. 

When the final whistle blew ending 
the Kingston game, the following boys 
had completed their high school foot- 
ball : Andrew Basler, Arthur Ragazzini, 
Earl Pimental, Frank Mello, Vincent 
Neri, James Boyle, Albert Albertini, and 
Bradford Martin. 

With Louis Poluzzi, Alvin Tavares, 
Donald Hughes, Alton Whiting, Gildo 
Govoni, Tony Govoni, Robert Proffetty, 
Nicholas Carbone, and Alexander Bar- 
bieri returning, the prospects for a good 
season next year are bright. 



BASKET! 



Plymouth's basketball season was 
disastrous as far as winning games was 
concerned. The schedule showed nine 
victories as against thirteen defeats. 
Many of the games lost, however, were 
very close and were not decided until 
the last few minutes of the play. 

Coach Jack Smith was hindered at the 
beginning of the season because of the 
lack of experienced material. Only one 
member of last year's crack team an- 
swered the basketball call. 

One bright spot in Plymouth's sched- 
ule was the magnificent showing in the 
Brockton Y. M. C. A. Tournament. 
Plymouth beat Attleboro decisively, then 
beat Rockland by one point. Incidentally, 
this game was considered one of the 
fastest and most interesting of the 



tournament. Going into the semi-finals, 
Plymouth met Weymouth. The huge 
crowd and continuous noise tended to 
make the team nervous, and it was not 
until the last half that the boys found 
themselves and began to do things; but 
Weymouth had too much of a lead to be 
overcome. Plymouth lost, but much 
credit must be extended to the coach and 
players, for the team was picked to lose 
in the first round of the tourney. 

Next year, it is predicted, will be a far 
better one for the basketball team, for 
the coach will have Alton Whiting and 
Louis Poluzzi, two of this year's first 
string men, as well as Harold Raymond, 
Mario Garuti, Gabriel Ferazzi, and An- 
tonio Medares who played with the 
second team and also saw much service 
with the first team. 

The players lost by graduation are 
Captain Bradford Martin, Atteo Fer- 
azzi, James Boyle, and Gerald Mayo. 

In the intra-mural basketball games, 
"Babe" James' team was again victori- 
ous for the second successive year. His 
boys won six games and lost none. 
Second place went to Harold Clark's 
sharpshooters who won five games and 
lost one to "Babe" James by a point. 



BATTER UP! 



With the first warm days of spring, 
the inter-class baseball games began. 
The sophomores became class cham- 
pions when they defeated the seniors in 
the final game. From the players of the 
different classes, "Chief" Bagnall picked 
the outstanding ones to represent the 
school in outside competition. The team 
opened up with Rockland at Rockland 
and was defeated fourteen to seven, 
errors proving costly. The boys then 
journeyed to Middleboro and lost again, 
nine to five. Opening at home, they 
were defeated by Bridgewater in a 
weird game by the score of thirteen to 
ten. Plymouth played Kingston at King- 
ston and won a victory of nine to two. 
As this account goes to press, the boys 
are practising for their second game 
with Rockland. 



38 



THE PILGRIM 




BASKETBALL TEAM 
First Row, Coach Jack Smith, Louis Poluzzi, Alton Whiting, Bradford Martin, Atteo Ferazzi, James 

Boyle, Manager Charles Maccal'erri 
Second Row, Gabriel Ferazzi, Antone Medeiros, Gerald Mayo, Robert Volk, Harold Raymond, 

Nicholas Carboni, Mario Garuti 




GIRL" BASKETBALL TEAM 
First Row, Margaret Donovan, Teresa Govi, Lucy Mayo, Janet Clarke, Helen Brewer, Alice Hall, 

Cynthia Drew, Katharine Christie 
Second Row, Phyllis Lovell, Mar.jorie Tracy, Elizabeth Vaughn, Katharine Lahey, Lois Brewster, 

Marjorie Cantoni, Evelyn Schrieber 
Third Row, Jeanette Goodwin, Mary Brigida, Mary Wield, Jean Whiting, Mary Curtin, Alice Wood, 

Aurora Regini 
Fourth Row, Coach Beatrice Garvin, Ruth Valler, Dorothy Haley, Alma Schreiber, Nellie Pierce, 

Jennie Mazzilli 



THE PILGRIM 



39 



ON THE LINE! 



An inexperienced track team with 
very few veterans opened the season 
with Hingham to be defeated by a large 
score, but Plymouth gained a victory 
over the Sandwich team shortly after- 
wards. Plymouth next bowed low to a 
very strong Barnstable team, the score 
being fifty to nineteen. As this goes to 
press, the P. H. S. tracksters are train- 
ing hard for the annual district meet. 
Bradford Martin 



Girls' Athletics 



Hockey 

We had a fairly successful season this 
year with forty girls out in the upper 
classes and fifteen in the freshman. The 
squad began with six teams playing 
intra-mural games, this series being 
won by Alma Guidetti's team. A game 
between the freshmen and the upper- 
classmen was played and won by the 
latter. 

Mrs. Garvin then chose a first and 
second team to represent the school in in- 
terscholastic games. They played seven 
games, losing to Kingston and Marsh- 
field, tying Kingston in the home game 
and Marshfield and Hyannis away from 
home, and winning over Scituate, Tabor, 
and the alumnae. 

As Mrs. Garvin loses only three of 
her players through graduation, the out- 
look is very bright for next season. 



three other schools, the first team won 
four out of six games, while the second 
team, whose ability was almost equal to 
that of the first, went through the season 
undefeated. 

The schedule was as follows : 

School Team Place Score 

E. Bridgewater 1 here 32-9 

E. Bridgewater 2 here 16-4 

Bourne 1 here 32-15 

Bourne 2 here 20-9 

Middleboro 1 there 18-27 

Middleboro 2 there 23-6 

E. Bridgewater 1 there 25-36 

E. Bridgewater 2 there 15-8 

Bourne 1 there 25-12 

Bourne 2 there 22-17 

Middleboro 1 here 18-9 

Middleboro 2 here 15-2 

The season ended with inter-class 
games in which the Juniors took all the 
honors. The girls are looking forward 
to an excellent season next year as only 
a few seniors will be lost through gradu- 
ation. 

Helen Brewer 



Baseball 

The baseball candidates began base- 
ball with early practice. They have 
elected Lucy Mayo as captain, and have 
already had one exciting game with 
Scituate in which they were finally 
beaten 10-14. With more games still to 
be played they hope to have a good sea- 
son. 



Track 

The track team is practicing eagerly 
as Mrs. Garvin has hopes of taking the 
girls to a track meet. 



Basketball 

There was a large and enthusiastic 
turnout of candidates for basketball this 
year. Intra-mural team games were 
played, captained by Clark, Vaughn, 
Martinelli, Govi, Mellor, and Brewer. 
First and second teams were chosen by 
Mrs. Garvin, and Captains Brewer and 
C. Drew were elected for interscholastic 
games. Although the teams played only 



AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL 

beautiful for darkened skies, 
For surplus waves of grain, 

For crimedom's undisputed rise 
In unemployment's train ! 
America! America! 

God guide thy stumbling feet, 

And lend His aid to Truth's parade 

From street to city street ! 

beautiful for soldiers' feet 

Which tread the bonus march ; 
Which menace right and mercy's seat 

From 'neath the Triumph Arch ! 
America! America! 

step thou from this plane ; 
And fight your fight with all thy might 

For freedom's lasting reign ! 

beautiful for Huey Long ; 

For Johnson-Coughlin fight; 
For free relief and N. R. A., 

And grafting parasite ! 

America ! America ! 

God save thy waning life, 
While from above comes perfect love 

In darkness and in strife! 

beautiful for tyrants' rule, 

Depressions greatest sin, 
For demagogic principle 
And rotten vice within ! 

America! America! 
God make thy future bright, 
When wars shall cease and we, in peace, 
Reciprocate thy light ! 

George Farnell '34 



40 



THE PILGRIM 




GIRLS' HOCKEY TEAM 

Fir.sl Row, Elizabeth Vaughn, Margaret Donovan, Teresa Govi, Janet Clarke, Alice Hall, Aurora 

Regini, Alma Guidetti, Edna Nickerson 
Second Row, Phyllis Lovell, Marjorie Tracy, Lucy Mayo, Katharine Christie, Jean Whiting, Mary 

Curtin, Cynthia Drew 
Third Row, Coach Beatrice Garvin, Ruth Valler, Dorothy Haley, Mary Brigida, Mary Wield, Bernice 

Thayer, Alma Schreiber, Alice Wood, Evelyn Schreiber 



FRESHMAN POETRY 



ROAMING 

The little waves were lapping 

Upon the stones and sand, 
They seemed to say, "Come boating, 

And stay no more on land." 

So out I went across the bay 

And sailed into a cove 
Where clear and tranquil waters lay, 

And all blue skies above. 

Sand on the shore was very white 
With green grass at its edge 

Reaching to the woods of night 
Along the mossy ledge. 

The murmuring pines and oak 
And graceful white birch tree 

Made promises with feathered folk 
To guard their young folk wee. 

But twilight comes and darkness falls, 
And weary birds are homing, 

The whip-poor-will so plaintive calls, 
And I return from roaming. 

Carol Handy '38 



CHIMNEY SMOKE 
I love to see the chimney smoke, 

It puffs so gleefully, 
And breaks in curls of softest gray 

With joyous ecstasy. 

It seems alive, awake, and free, 
A vagrant of the sky, 
A lazy restless vagabond, 
Who greets each passer-by. 

Talbot Cobb '38 



ex- 



HIGHLAND LIGHT 
High upon the bluff it stands, 

Towering o'er the raging main ; 
High above the drifting sands 

A challenge to wind and rain. 
There's something strange I can't 
plain 

About a lighthouse tall and white, 
I've tried a thousand times in vain 

To grasp one beam of flashing light. 
Sombre, silent as a ghost, 

Like a sentry at his post, 
It scorns the wrath of wintry clime, 

Faithful to the end of time. 

Janet Broadbent '38 



THE PILGRIM 



41 



WHEN I WAS SMALL 

The house in which I lived when I was 

small 
Is standing yet, beside the same old pool, 
And honeysuckle still climbs o'er the 

door, 
And drooping- elms' shade makes the 

porch cool. 
To passers-by the gables tall seem bleak, 
Especially in the cold days of fall, 
But if inside, they saw the attic peak 
That seems to echo each sweet childish 

call, 
They would know why I still seek 
The house in which I lived when I was 

small. 

Virginia Ryder '35 



TEMPTATION 



I met a man the other day, 

A man both strong and mean ; 

A look was in his evil eye 

Whose like is seldom seen. 

He scowled and frowned and tramped 

around, 
I trembled through and through, 
But I looked him straight in his evil eye 
And cried, "Who's afraid of you?" 

And when he heard this daring cry, 
He cowered to the ground, 
The evil look then left his eye, 
And the sun shone all around. 
He shrank before my steady gaze, 
And vanished in a bluish haze. 

Temptations come to frighten us, 
But weak in every part, 
They melt before the strong man's eye, 
And flee the brave of heart. 

Ruth Bumpus '37 



THE CEILING 

Winding paths through heavy obstruc- 
tions, 

Grotesque canyons worn by time, 
White plains of icy smoothness, 

Wrinkled corners indicating age. 
Patched clouds of dusty amber 

Painted by the artist rain, 
The ribbed skeleton broken through — 

The ancient ceiling needs repair. 

Warren Bradford '36 



THE LAMP OF KNOWLEDGE 

With but one ling'ring glance behind, 

A fleeting glimpse at all our days to- 
gether here, 

Where education's guiding had has led 
us on, 

We turn to face the future with percep- 
tion clear. 

And now has come the day, the hour, 

At which the guiding hand must loose 
its gentle hold, 

And, stepping forth unaided on life's 
untried road, 

With eyes uplifted, each alone shall see 
his life unfold. 

The knowledge we have thus far gained 

Must be the lamp to light the coming 
years, 

To hold it high, wick trimmed and burn- 
ing brightly 

Shall be our aim in laughter or in tears. 

Lamp of Knowledge, let thy beam 

In ever wid'ning rays descend to light 
our way, 

And let none, groping, fail to find his 
chosen path, 

Or from the lighted road of wisdom 
ever stray. 

Lucy Holmes '35 



ALONE 
I listened — 
As the Master gently drew his bow 

across the muted strings, 
I dreamed — 

Of peace and quiet and happiness. 
I drifted 

Into another world, — 
I alone heard 
As He played — Liebestraume. 

D. Pederzani '36 



Continued from page 36 

Excerpt From Exchanges 

With this bit of pessimistic philoso- 
phy from the "Stetson Oracle" we take 
our leave. 

"The school gets all the benefit, 
The students all the fame, 

The printer gets the money, 

But the staff gets all the blame." 

The Editors 



42 



THE PILGRIM 




STUDENT ACTIVITIES SOCIETY 
First Row, Elizabeth Ryan, Audrey Dutton, Alba Martinelli, Charles Maccaferri, Lois Brewster, 

Mar.jorie Bradford, Lucy Holmes, Mary Bodell 
Second How, Marie Roncarati, Anthony Caramello, Ralph Lamborghini, Miss Carey, Doris Pederzani, 

Mary Wield, Jean Whiting, Barbara Mellor 
Third Row, Atteo Ferazzi, Vincent Baietti, John Ryan, Stephen Cappannari, Alice Wood, Janet 

Clarke 
Fourth Row, Albeit Padovani, Donald Tracy, Mary Curtin, Miss Locklin, Mary Brigida, Thelma 

Ferioli 
Fifth Row, Deane Beytes, Mr. Shipman, Miss Brown, faculty sponsor, Belty Mordt, Lucy Mayo, 

Francis Scheid, Bradford Martin, Anthony Tavernelli, Frank Mello 



giVE A THOUGHT 

TO THE FUTURE 

1 J, AVE you thought of the time when you will be ready to take your place 
in the world of industry? Have you picked the career you wish to follow? 



Why not, then, follow the example of 
many other New England girls .... 
choose Beauty Culture, the profession 
that insures success . . . that means 
good positions — a professional career 
and a pleasing vocation. 
The Wilfred Academy of Hair and 
Beauty Culture, is an ethical school 
manned by a faculty of world famous 



sign and beauty culture. It thoroughly 
trains you to become an accredited 
professional. 

A Wilfred diploma enjoys unequaled 
prestige with beauty experts every- 
where. It entitles you to respect and 
honor and it is a gurarantee that you 
are well versed in all the fundamen- 
tals of this fascinating field. 



authorities in all branches of hair de- 
Call, write or phone for illustrated booklet "24E" — Day and evening classes. 
Register now, so that you may be sure of a place in our classes 
the day after your school term is over. 

WILFRED ACADEMY 

of BEAUTY CULTURE 

492 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. KENmore 7286 
Also NEW YORK, BROOKLYN, PHILADELPHIA, NEWARK 



THE PILGRIM 43 



5n Utemnrram 



Albert %. MMar 



Shrank E Jfelj 



3Fatttj (B. Stalker 



44 



THE PILGRIM 



Music or Dramatics 
For a Profession or Avocation 

If you possess a talent for Music or Dramatics, you 
should consider further study in your chosen field. As a 
profession it offers the advantages of congenial work 
and as an avocation, the life-long benefits of participa- 
tion in and appreciation of cultural activities. 

. NewBigland , 
Conservatory 



Wallace Goodrich 
Director 



OF MUSIC 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



Year Opens 
September 19, 1935 



Our students receive a thorough 
training combining expert in- 
struction with experience in fre- 



Dramatic students participate in 
a full season of Dramatic pro- 
grams given annually. Our 



quent public appearances. Ad- students receive the full benefits 
vanced students are offered of an excellent faculty and un- 
membership in the Conservatory usual facilities for study, prac- 
Symphony Orchestra or presen- tice and public presentations, 
tation as Soloists. 

Students received for study of Single Subjects. 
Diplomas and Collegiate Degrees conferred. 

You should give yourself the advantages of the training 
provided by New England Conservatory of Music ack- 
nowledged as a Leader since 1867, in preparation for 
positions as Soloist, Ensemble Player, Orchestra Mem- 
ber, Teacher, Opera Singer, Composer, Actor, Dancer, 
Little Theatre Director, etc. Our training prepares you 
and our Prestige aids you. Visit or write to Frederick 
S. Converse, Dean. 


1 — 1 Please put my name on your mailing list for 
Free tickets to Conservatory concerts and recitals. 

r~| Please send Catalog of Courses. 


Send this Coupon or a letter 
to Frederick S. Converse, 

Dean of Faculty. 

New England Conservatory 

of Music 

Huntington Avenue 

Boston, Mass. 






I will graduate from High School in 193 









THE PILGRIM 



45 



AFTER GRADUATION WHAT? 

High School graduation brings stu- 
dents with a talent for music, acting or 
any of the fine arts, face to face with the 
decision as to what place their artistic 
ability shall play in their lives during 
the years ahead. The person interested 
in Music or Dramatics should decide 
whether his or her talent, ability, and in- 
terest justifies making these arts and 
the practice of them a profession from 
which he or she expects to make a living. 
If a student intends to follow some other 
work as a vocation, some provision 
should be made to continue the study of 
music or dramatics as an avocation or 
cultural activity. 

The student who decides upon music 
as a profession should assure himself or 
herself of getting the best and most com- 
plete training available. There is com- 
petition for the valuable positions in 
music as in all other fields of work, and 
the preparatory training received, as 
well as the prestige of the school atten- 
ded, often decides who fills a desirable 
position. It is often best for a student in 
the teens to enroll at a school of the type 
of the New England Conservatory of 
Music. There it is possible to study one 
subject, such as violin or voice, or to take 
a course including both interpretive 
playing or singing and theoretical sub- 

*.—,.— .,>.—.„,—.„.— <,—„— .„_,,.— .„<—.„.— .„-.„_„— „_<,—. 
I 



jects, languages, college subjects, etc., 
which will earn a Diploma of a Collegi- 
ate degree, such as Bachelor of Music. 
Such a large conservatory offers the 
students an opportunity to participate 
in public recitals, play in, or appear as 
soloist with, a Symphony orchestra and 
associate with successful musicians. 

If one is interested only in studying 
music or dramatics as a cultural activity 
or avocation, it is still important to ob- 
tain the best instruction and training 
available, and the benefits to the individ- 
ual continue throughout life. If one 
follows a musical or dramatic education 
until proficiency is attained, the skill, 
knowledge, and experience gained is pre- 
paration for professional work in these 
fields if it ever becomes necessary as a 
livelihood. But whatever use is made of 
musical or dramatic training, the person 
who receives it always enjoys the ad- 
vantages of being able to appreciate and 
take part in such activities when the op- 
portunities arise. They get more enjoy- 
ment out of recitals, concerts, and plays, 
and, when amateur productions are be- 
ing staged, they are eligible and able to 
take leading parts. As a contribution 
to happy, enjoyable, and creative living, 
nothing can take the place of musical or 
dramatic training. 



I 



STEVENS THE FLORIST 

FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 
9 Court Street 

Member of The Florist Telegraph Delivery Association 

IT HAS BEEN OUR GREAT PLEASURE 

TO SERVE BOTH THE HIGH AND 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS DURING 

THE SCHOOL YEARS FROM 1929 TO 1935 

LAHEY'S 
High Quality Ice Cream 



46 THE PILGRIM 



JOHN E. JORDAN CO. 

Your Hardware Store for 110 Years 

PAINTS, HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES, 
PLUMBING, HEATING, and SHEET METAL WORK 

Plymouth Tel. 283 Mass. 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS 

Transparent Water Colors 

India Ink, black and colors 

Brushes and Water Colors 

Oil and Water Colors 

Sketching Blocks 

Drawing Papers 

A. S. BURBANK 



Pilgrim Book And Art Shop 



SENIORS 

You'll want to look your best when you step up to receive your diploma, 

at that great event — Graduation. 

We have the suits, ties, shirts, and shoes that will give you the 

well-dressed appearance that you desire. 
Visit our store and let us assist you in making your selections. 

PURITAN CLOTHING COMPANY 

"Plymouth's Largest Store for Men and Boys" 
56 Main Street Tel. 1121 Plymouth 



Compliments of 

CAPPANNARI BROS. 



THE PILGRIM 



47 



BREAKING IT GENTLY 

She insisted on taking innumerable 
frocks with her as they were going 
to the mountains for their vacation. 
They arrived at the station loaded 
with baggage. 

"I wish," said he thoughtfully, "that 
we'd brought the piano, too." 
"You needn't try to be sarcastic," 
came the frigid reply. 
"I'm not trying to be funny," he ex- 
plained sadly. "I left the tickets on 
the piano." 

GENEROUS 

Mother : (After reading a pathetic story 
to Reggie) "Now, Reggie, wouldn't 
you like to give your bunny to that 
poor little boy who hasn't any 
father?" 

Reggie: (clutching the bunny) "Could- 
n't we give him father instead?" 

GO HOME, SIR ! 

Doorkeeper: (at movie) "Hey, come 
back! Dogs aren't allowed inside." 

Collegian: (without pausing) "That's 
not my dog!" 

Doorkeeper: (pursuing) "Not your 
dog! Why, he's following you." 

Collegian : "What of it? So are you." 

THE INSPIRED SOLUTION 
There was some cold pudding at 
luncheon, and Mamma divided it equally 
between Willie and Elsie. Willie looked 
at his pudding, then at his empty plate. 
"Mamma," he said earnestly, "I can't 
enjoy my pudding when you haven't 
any. Take Elsie's!" 

ALL WET 

Assistant : "No, madam, we haven't had 
any for a long time." 

Manager: (overhearing) "Oh, yes, we 
have it, madam ; I'll send to the ware- 
house and have some brought in for 
you." (Aside to assistant) : "Never 
refuse anything. Send out for it." 

As the woman went out laughing, the 
manager demanded: "What did she 
ask for?" 

Assistant: She said, "We haven't had 
any rain lately." 

DESPERATE 
Willie, having received a gun and a 

diary for Christmas, wrote in his 

diary : 
"December 26: Snowin', can't go 

huntin'." 
"December 27: Snowin' still, can't go 

huntin'." 
"December 28: Still snowin', shot 

Grammaw." 



Congratulations 
TO THE CLASS OF 1935 

For Your After-Graduation Party 
"Hire A Bus" 



Plymouth 8C Brockton 
Street Railway Co. 



ZANELLO BEDDING CO. 



BEDDING UPHOLSTERING 



FURNITURE 



28 Sandwich St. Tel. 1485 Plymouth 



W. R. Davis 



H. S. Hatch 



DAVIS & MORGAN 
ELECTRIC CO. 

Electrical Problems Honestly Solved 
DEPENDABLE WIRING 

Plymouth, Mass., Since 1919 Tel. 290 



H. A. BRADFORD 

Distributor for 
S. S. Pierce Specialties 
Birdseye Frosted Foods 



1 Warren Ave. 



Tel. 1298-W 



48 



THE PILGRIM 



j BANDER'S 
j WOMEN'S SHOP 

Misses' and Women's Apparel 

AT POPULAR PRICES 
54 Main Street Plymouth 


j 

Compliments of 

TOWN BROOK , 
SERVICE STATION t 


i Compliments of 

j DR. G. W. SCHILLING 




Compliments of j 

OLD COLONY LAUNDRY j 

OF PLYMOUTH j 


Compliments of 
GAMBINI'S 


j EXPERT SHOE REPAIRING 
PLYMOUTH SHOE HOSPITAL 




ICE-CREAM - SODAS * 
CANDIES — CIGARS, ETC. j 

OLD COLONY CANDY SHOPPE p 


j WHEN THERE IS BETTER WORK DONE 
j WE WILL DO IT 

I JOHN H. GO VI 
1 TAILOR 


| Main Street Plymouth 


Compliments of | 
DR. E. HAROLD DONOVAN ; 


j ON THE RADIO 

Enna Jettick Shoes For Ladies 
I Franklin Shoes For Men 


j EDDIE'S SHOE SYSTEM 

j 18 Main Street Edward Hand, Mgr. 


NO ESCAPE ( 

"I suppose," said the sympathetic! 
prison visitor, "that you were tempted j 
and fell?" j 

"Yes, mum," replied the convict, j 
"Tempted by a handbag, and fell over aj 
dog." 

— Exchange * 

AND YOU MAY NOT ! 

The only universal rule for wooing? 
sleep seems to me Mark Twain's: "If! 
you cannot sleep, try lying on the edgej 
of the bed — then you may drop off." j 

— Our Paper 


PLYMOUTH BAKING CO. 

1 Bread, Pies, and Cakes 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 
20 Market St. Tel. 225-M Plymouth 


Compliments of 
THE BRADFORD ARMS 
j GIFT SHOP 



THE PILGRIM 



49 



Burdett Business Training 



• Courses for Young Men: Business Administration and Accounting, as 

preparation for sales, credit, financial, office management and 
accounting positions. College grade instruction. 

Open to High School Graduate -\ 

• Courses for Young Women: Executive Secretarial, Stenographic Secretarial, 

also Finishing Courses, as preparation for promising secretarial 
positions. Individual advancement. 

Open to High School Graduate r 

• Courses for Young Men and Young Women: General Business, Book- 

keeping, Shorthand and Typewriting, as preparation for general 
business and office positions. 

Open to High School Graduates 



Previous commercial 
training not required 
for entrance. Many 
leading colleges repre- 
sented in attendance. 



Send for 
Illustrated Catalog 




Burdett College 

f H BURDETT, President 

156 STUART STREET, POSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
TELEPHONE HANCOCK 6300 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



BUTTNER 



Compliments of 



SADOW'S MEN'S SHOP 



50 THE PILGRIM 




TABILITY 



• We have to our credit a total of 129 years of 

service. 

• Old in years, experience, and the tested 

principles of Public Service 

• But ever new in creating new standards of 

Home Economy 

• During these years we have contributed to 

the steady growth of the territory served 
and have become a part of the life of these 
communities. 

• We expect to continue to serve you and the 

generations to come as we have the gener- 
ations gone by. 



Plymouth Gas Light Co. 
Plymouth Electric Light Co. 



THE PILGRIM 51 



N ORTi EASTERN 
UNIVERSITY 




Day Division 

SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Offers a broad program of college subjects serving as a foundation for the 
understanding of modern culture, social relations, and technical achievement, 
and including selected occupational courses. The purpose of this program is to 
give the student a liberal and cultural education and a vocational competence 
which fits him to enter some specific type of useful employment. The voca- 
tional options are in such fields as: Accounting, Advertising, Industrial Chem- 
istry, Teaching, Factory Administration, Salesmanship, Surveying and Top- 
ography, Physical Education, Industrial Relations, Business Practice, Draft- 
ing and Technical Drawing. 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Offers a college program with broad and thorough training in the principles 
of business with specialization in ACCOUNTING, BANKING AND FINANCE, 
or BUSINESS MANAGEMENT. Instruction is through modern methods in- 
cluding lectures, solution of business problems, class discussions, professional 
talks by business executives, and motion pictures of manufacturing processes. 

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

Provides complete college programs in Engineering with professional courses 
in the fields of CIVIL, MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL, CHEMICAL, and IN- 
DUSTRIAL ENGINEERING. General engineering courses are pursued dur- 
ing the Freshman year; thus the student need not make a final decision as to 
the branch of Engineering in which he wishes to specialize until the beginning 
of the Sophomore year. 

Co-operative Plan 

The Co-operative Plan, which is available to the students in all courses, pro- 
vides for a combination of practical industrial experience with classroom in- 
struction. Under this plan the student is able to earn a portion of his school 
expenses as well as to form business contacts which prove valuable in later 
years. 

Degrees Awarded 

The Bachelor of Science Degree is conferred upon all students who satis- 
factorily complete an approved course of study. 

For catalog or further information write to: 

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

MILTON J. SCHLAGENHAUF, Director of Admissions 
Boston, Massachusetts 



52 THE PILGRIM 



Autographs 

(Eta of 1935 




M«HK»i<T« 






I